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I’ll try to keep my snobbery to a minimum…

KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Find Love – Clem Snide, cialis generic healing Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra canada here Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Find Love – Clem Snide, cialis generic healing Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra canada here Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, cialis store well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too).


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Find Love – Clem Snide, cialis generic healing Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra canada here Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, cialis store well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too).


So I haven’t blogged in a week, buy viagra sickness mostly because my music room has been, pills well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Find Love – Clem Snide, cialis generic healing Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra canada here Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, cialis store well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too).


So I haven’t blogged in a week, buy viagra sickness mostly because my music room has been, pills well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, generic viagra thumb mostly because my music room has been, viagra well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Find Love – Clem Snide, cialis generic healing Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra canada here Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, cialis store well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too).


So I haven’t blogged in a week, buy viagra sickness mostly because my music room has been, pills well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, generic viagra thumb mostly because my music room has been, viagra well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, discount cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, sildenafil well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

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%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Find Love – Clem Snide, cialis generic healing Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra canada here Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, cialis store well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too).


So I haven’t blogged in a week, buy viagra sickness mostly because my music room has been, pills well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, generic viagra thumb mostly because my music room has been, viagra well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, discount cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, sildenafil well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy site mostly because my music room has been, doctor well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too)


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Find Love – Clem Snide, cialis generic healing Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra canada here Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, cialis store well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too).


So I haven’t blogged in a week, buy viagra sickness mostly because my music room has been, pills well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, generic viagra thumb mostly because my music room has been, viagra well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, discount cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, sildenafil well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy site mostly because my music room has been, doctor well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too)


BMG music service. Must have used 4 or 5 different names for concurrent subscriptions. But I always fulfilled each subscription’s obligatory purchases.

Time-Life music collection. I admit it; I ordered it from a late-night infomercial while in college – probably after a late night of drinking.

Music and Movies/TV. How do I get to be a soundtrack person?? Not sure how I feel about shows like The O.C. and Grey’s Anatomy using songs I like.

First two albums (cassettes) I bought: Huey Lewis – Sports, cialis generic try and Ghostbusters Soundtrack.

Music during Peace Corps. Frantic tape-making. Songs that didn’t exist then that would fit well retrospectively. Mom crying. Ride out to the airport with my father and brother [maybe an Iron&Wine song]. Nightly music-listening sessions on porch underneath stars and silence. Belting out Jack & Diane on the porch with friends. Listening to every morsel of every music program on BBC shortwave radio. Guinean pop. Going through mixes left behind by previous volunteers. Looking through other volunteers’ music collection. Asked family to ship Beatles Anthology series (and got a great care package of food and snacks). Music-buying binge after return. What would you take to Africa for two years?

Selections from mixes I’ve made.

I discovered Big Star late in life.

Music tastes as a teen. I hated it when my brothers would play Beatles all the time.

Recently watched a PBS program on Civil Rights Movement and Music.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Find Love – Clem Snide, cialis generic healing Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra canada here Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, cialis store well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too).


So I haven’t blogged in a week, buy viagra sickness mostly because my music room has been, pills well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, generic viagra thumb mostly because my music room has been, viagra well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, discount cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, sildenafil well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy site mostly because my music room has been, doctor well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too)


BMG music service. Must have used 4 or 5 different names for concurrent subscriptions. But I always fulfilled each subscription’s obligatory purchases.

Time-Life music collection. I admit it; I ordered it from a late-night infomercial while in college – probably after a late night of drinking.

Music and Movies/TV. How do I get to be a soundtrack person?? Not sure how I feel about shows like The O.C. and Grey’s Anatomy using songs I like.

First two albums (cassettes) I bought: Huey Lewis – Sports, cialis generic try and Ghostbusters Soundtrack.

Music during Peace Corps. Frantic tape-making. Songs that didn’t exist then that would fit well retrospectively. Mom crying. Ride out to the airport with my father and brother [maybe an Iron&Wine song]. Nightly music-listening sessions on porch underneath stars and silence. Belting out Jack & Diane on the porch with friends. Listening to every morsel of every music program on BBC shortwave radio. Guinean pop. Going through mixes left behind by previous volunteers. Looking through other volunteers’ music collection. Asked family to ship Beatles Anthology series (and got a great care package of food and snacks). Music-buying binge after return. What would you take to Africa for two years?

Selections from mixes I’ve made.

I discovered Big Star late in life.

Music tastes as a teen. I hated it when my brothers would play Beatles all the time.

Recently watched a PBS program on Civil Rights Movement and Music.



Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, viagra usa diagnosis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).

KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Find Love – Clem Snide, cialis generic healing Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra canada here Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, cialis store well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too).


So I haven’t blogged in a week, buy viagra sickness mostly because my music room has been, pills well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, generic viagra thumb mostly because my music room has been, viagra well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, discount cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, sildenafil well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy site mostly because my music room has been, doctor well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too)


BMG music service. Must have used 4 or 5 different names for concurrent subscriptions. But I always fulfilled each subscription’s obligatory purchases.

Time-Life music collection. I admit it; I ordered it from a late-night infomercial while in college – probably after a late night of drinking.

Music and Movies/TV. How do I get to be a soundtrack person?? Not sure how I feel about shows like The O.C. and Grey’s Anatomy using songs I like.

First two albums (cassettes) I bought: Huey Lewis – Sports, cialis generic try and Ghostbusters Soundtrack.

Music during Peace Corps. Frantic tape-making. Songs that didn’t exist then that would fit well retrospectively. Mom crying. Ride out to the airport with my father and brother [maybe an Iron&Wine song]. Nightly music-listening sessions on porch underneath stars and silence. Belting out Jack & Diane on the porch with friends. Listening to every morsel of every music program on BBC shortwave radio. Guinean pop. Going through mixes left behind by previous volunteers. Looking through other volunteers’ music collection. Asked family to ship Beatles Anthology series (and got a great care package of food and snacks). Music-buying binge after return. What would you take to Africa for two years?

Selections from mixes I’ve made.

I discovered Big Star late in life.

Music tastes as a teen. I hated it when my brothers would play Beatles all the time.

Recently watched a PBS program on Civil Rights Movement and Music.



Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, viagra usa diagnosis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).

Find Love – Clem Snide, viagra generic prescription Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, cheap Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Find Love – Clem Snide, cialis generic healing Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra canada here Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, cialis store well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too).


So I haven’t blogged in a week, buy viagra sickness mostly because my music room has been, pills well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, generic viagra thumb mostly because my music room has been, viagra well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, discount cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, sildenafil well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy site mostly because my music room has been, doctor well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too)


BMG music service. Must have used 4 or 5 different names for concurrent subscriptions. But I always fulfilled each subscription’s obligatory purchases.

Time-Life music collection. I admit it; I ordered it from a late-night infomercial while in college – probably after a late night of drinking.

Music and Movies/TV. How do I get to be a soundtrack person?? Not sure how I feel about shows like The O.C. and Grey’s Anatomy using songs I like.

First two albums (cassettes) I bought: Huey Lewis – Sports, cialis generic try and Ghostbusters Soundtrack.

Music during Peace Corps. Frantic tape-making. Songs that didn’t exist then that would fit well retrospectively. Mom crying. Ride out to the airport with my father and brother [maybe an Iron&Wine song]. Nightly music-listening sessions on porch underneath stars and silence. Belting out Jack & Diane on the porch with friends. Listening to every morsel of every music program on BBC shortwave radio. Guinean pop. Going through mixes left behind by previous volunteers. Looking through other volunteers’ music collection. Asked family to ship Beatles Anthology series (and got a great care package of food and snacks). Music-buying binge after return. What would you take to Africa for two years?

Selections from mixes I’ve made.

I discovered Big Star late in life.

Music tastes as a teen. I hated it when my brothers would play Beatles all the time.

Recently watched a PBS program on Civil Rights Movement and Music.



Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, viagra usa diagnosis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).

Find Love – Clem Snide, viagra generic prescription Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, cheap Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


best cialis salve 0, buy viagra 40,0″ width=”380″>Find Love – Clem Snide, Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.

Janglin, Edward Sharpe. frolic in the meadow.

More of This, Vetiver.


KCRW, cialis sale generic a public radio station in Santa Monica, viagra stomach
has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994; not available on vinyl), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis sales viagra a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)


KCRW, discount viagra cialis a public radio station in Santa Monica, has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.

KCRW, viagra canada sale a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis canada has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale.


KCRW, cialis sales diagnosis a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis buy cialis sale has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.


KCRW, cialis medical a public radio station in Santa Monica, cialis generic sickness has been at the forefront of new music of all genres for decades and home to three of the best music programs on radio: Morning Becomes Eclectic, New Ground, and Sounds Eclectic. I might have never heard these programs had I not accidentally come across a used CD at a local music store during my senior year in college. The CD was Rare On Air, Volume 1 (1994), a compilation of live, mostly acoustic performances at KCRW that not only had wonderful songs, but also opened a whole new musical world that I’m still exploring to this day. Fourteen years later, it’s still one of the best compilations in my collection.

Every song is quite good, but a few are just exceptional – and it all starts with the unmistakable voice of Leonard Cohen, who recites his short, but beautiful poem:

I Heard of a man who says words so beautifully
That if he only speaks their name, women give themselves to him
If I am dumb beside your body while silence blossoms like tumors in our lips
It is because I hear a man climb the stairs and clear his throat outside our door.

The poem seamlessly transitions into the first track, “Silent All These Years”, by Tori Amos. While I’m generally not an Amos fan, the poem sets the perfect, subdued mood for the song. On the second track, John Cale dramatically re-works, “Cordoba”, a song he originally did with Brian Eno. Unlike the sonically complex original version, the live version is just Cale and his piano (played with a march-like cadence), but still somber in tone. (Speaking of somber, I love his cover of Cohen’s “Hallelujah”, which not enough people have heard since it’s automatically associated with Jeff Buckley’s cover).

Just before you start reaching for your anti-depressants, the third track starts and out comes one of the most exquisite melodies you’ll ever have the pleasure to hear – made even more pleasurable by its simple, yet life-affirming lyrics. Peter Himmelman’s “Always in Disguise” is on my desert-island mix, and it should be on yours too.

Always In Disguise, Peter Himmelman (aka Bob Dylan’s son-in-law).

The fourth track, “My Drug Buddy”, is Evan Dando (The Lemonheads) and his acoustic guitar with harmony provided by Juliana Hatfield (Blake Babies). I don’t know what it is about Dando’s voice accompanied by a solo acoustic guitar, but man, I can listen to him all day long.

My Drug Buddy, Evan Dando with Juliana Hatfield.

Without this compilation, it’s quite conceivable that I would never have explored the music of X, Nick Cave, Lucinda Williams and Chet Baker. If it weren’t for X, the seminal California punk band, I may not have explored punk beyond The Clash and failed to discover The New York Dolls, MC5, Television, The Ramones, and The Stooges. As for Nick Cave, I admit I didn’t get his music at first, but man, once I did I was sold. I eventually worshipped at the altar of Nick Cave (and the Bad Seeds) out of both love, and uhm, fear. If you listen to enough of his music, then you’ll know what I mean.

God’s Hotel, Nick Cave.

Lucinda Williams’ cover of a Nick Drake song (“Which Will”) set me on three paths of music discovery: Nick Drake, Williams’ earlier folk-blues catalog, and acoustic folk-blues music in general, all of which I’m sure I’ll write more about in future entries. And Chet Baker? Well, he’s not actually in the compilation, but it does include an achingly beautiful David Wilcox song called, “Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song”, which imagines the life and tragedy of Chet Baker. At that point I was still learning about Jazz and hadn’t really paid any attention to Chet Baker (who I wrote about earlier), but after hearing Wilcox’s song I had to find out more.

Chet Baker’s Unsung Swan Song, David Wilcox. This too is on my desert-island mix. (Btw, this performance is better than the original on his Home Again album.)

As a bonus, here’s Hallelujah, by John Cale. It’s from the tribute album, I’m Your Fan: Songs of Leonard Cohen (1991). Jeff Buckley was clearly influenced by Cale’s version.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra usa hospital and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, seek without any sense of irony, help proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Find Love – Clem Snide, generic viagra treatment Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, discount viagra sales Alight of Night

help
%20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Set Sail Tomorrow, Montt Mardié.


Find Love – Clem Snide, buy viagra see Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra Alight of Night

recipe %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Find Love – Clem Snide, cialis generic healing Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, viagra canada here Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, cialis store well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too).


So I haven’t blogged in a week, buy viagra sickness mostly because my music room has been, pills well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, generic viagra thumb mostly because my music room has been, viagra well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, discount cialis buy cialis mostly because my music room has been, sildenafil well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.


So I haven’t blogged in a week, cialis buy site mostly because my music room has been, doctor well, missing an important item (the amp), but in anticipation of returning to audio heaven tonight, I wanted to quickly share a recent discovery. Apparently, there’s a cornucopia of new Swedish pop stars extending their reach beyond the beautiful fjords of Sweden. While I suppose Lykke Li is the best known of the bunch, I love the joyful, retro (circa 1985), occasionally horn-laden, unapologetic pop sounds of Montt Mardié (David Pagmar). On his MySpace page, he lists his influences:

genesis / burt bacharach / the cure / john coltrane / temptations / joy division / sinatra / miles davis / paul mccartney / jay-z / duran duran / elvis

Yeah, I think that covers it.

One of my favorite songs, Set Sail Tomorrow, has Bacharach written all over it (and maybe a little Bright Eyes too)


BMG music service. Must have used 4 or 5 different names for concurrent subscriptions. But I always fulfilled each subscription’s obligatory purchases.

Time-Life music collection. I admit it; I ordered it from a late-night infomercial while in college – probably after a late night of drinking.

Music and Movies/TV. How do I get to be a soundtrack person?? Not sure how I feel about shows like The O.C. and Grey’s Anatomy using songs I like.

First two albums (cassettes) I bought: Huey Lewis – Sports, cialis generic try and Ghostbusters Soundtrack.

Music during Peace Corps. Frantic tape-making. Songs that didn’t exist then that would fit well retrospectively. Mom crying. Ride out to the airport with my father and brother [maybe an Iron&Wine song]. Nightly music-listening sessions on porch underneath stars and silence. Belting out Jack & Diane on the porch with friends. Listening to every morsel of every music program on BBC shortwave radio. Guinean pop. Going through mixes left behind by previous volunteers. Looking through other volunteers’ music collection. Asked family to ship Beatles Anthology series (and got a great care package of food and snacks). Music-buying binge after return. What would you take to Africa for two years?

Selections from mixes I’ve made.

I discovered Big Star late in life.

Music tastes as a teen. I hated it when my brothers would play Beatles all the time.

Recently watched a PBS program on Civil Rights Movement and Music.



Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, viagra usa diagnosis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).

Find Love – Clem Snide, viagra generic prescription Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, cheap Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.


best cialis salve 0, buy viagra 40,0″ width=”380″>Find Love – Clem Snide, Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, Alight of Night

Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”

Best Support Actress, One for the Team.

Janglin, Edward Sharpe. frolic in the meadow.

More of This, Vetiver.



I was recently on a panel of music experts to discuss the proliferation of music blogs and their use of copyrighted materials, viagra cialis and at one point a douchebag record label lawyer-for-hire, without any sense of irony, proceeded to lecture the panel about the integrity of music and its creators…like Britney Spears. While I perfectly acknowledge Britney’s right to breathe, I have serious objections to the inclusion of Britney Spears in any sentence containing the words, “integrity”, “music”, and “creator”. The douchebag then asked the panel, “How many of you have a music blog?” Every hand but mine proudly went up. Ohhh woe is me – what kind of a music expert am I?!? I’m obviously nothing but a pretender. When asked why I had such a gaping hole in my life, I simply said,

“Hmmm…I love music and I like to write, so why the hell not?!?”

Now, of course, this was an entirely imaginary, albeit elaborate conversation in the skewed corners of my mind that, perhaps in retrospect, borders a little too closely on delusion. Nonetheless, I do love many forms of music and generally don’t find writing to be a completely debilitating activity, so indeed, why the hell not?!? What harm could it possibly do? At worst, I’ll just join the growing ranks of blogs that started with much fanfare (frequent posts and a smattering of obligatory comments from family/friends/other much more popular bloggers returning the favor mostly out of pity) only to die a slow, painful death (infrequent posts and self-submitted comments pretending to be fans). As Cracker once put it, the world needs another music blog like I need a hole in my head – or, uhm, something like that. But music matters, and I want to share the music that I love; sometimes I wish I could even force people to love it – is that so wrong???

I should mention that I am a recovering music snob; I don’t and can’t conceal it entirely, but I do promise to keep it to a minimum because in the end nobody likes snobs. I really don’t want to be a snob – really. I’m working on it. I’ll get better. So I appreciate, in advance, your understanding and patience.

Britney Spears is an affront to music.
Oops, I did it a-gain.


Posted in Music and Life.