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Gateway Song to ElectroPop: “Destiny” by Zero 7; or How I Came to Like Phoenix and Passion Pit

Seriously, sildenafil cialis who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, discount viagra find the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery made me press the Repeat button quite a bit.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.



Seriously, sildenafil cialis who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, discount viagra find the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery made me press the Repeat button quite a bit.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.


Seriously, discount viagra ambulance who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, no rx the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, viagra Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery made me press the Repeat button quite a bit.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s beautiful Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.


Seriously, sildenafil cialis who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, discount viagra find the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery made me press the Repeat button quite a bit.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.


Seriously, discount viagra ambulance who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, no rx the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, viagra Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery made me press the Repeat button quite a bit.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s beautiful Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.


Seriously, viagra generic medical who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, sildenafil the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery demanded repeated listening – and I complied.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s beautiful Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.


Seriously, sildenafil cialis who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, discount viagra find the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery made me press the Repeat button quite a bit.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.


Seriously, discount viagra ambulance who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, no rx the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, viagra Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery made me press the Repeat button quite a bit.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s beautiful Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.


Seriously, viagra generic medical who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, sildenafil the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery demanded repeated listening – and I complied.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s beautiful Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.


Find Love – Clem Snide, viagra usa viagra Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, prostate Alight of Night

tadalafil %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


Seriously, sildenafil cialis who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, discount viagra find the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery made me press the Repeat button quite a bit.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.


Seriously, discount viagra ambulance who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, no rx the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, viagra Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery made me press the Repeat button quite a bit.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s beautiful Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.


Seriously, viagra generic medical who doesn’t love the cello? One of very few instruments that somehow manage to have a majestic yet intimate quality, sildenafil the cello just makes me feel…good. Its timbre is as unmistakable as its resonance is deep. While most people inevitably associate the cello to Classical music and in turn to one of its most popular figures, Yo-Yo Ma, it’s actually quite satisfying to hear it used in other genres. Admittedly, Yo-Yo Ma himself has a long history of incorporating it in his genre-bending albums, but I had never heard it featured in popular music until I came across Ben Sollee’s Learning to Bend album from 2008. Despite what may seem like a handicap, he seamlessly blended Americana, Jazz and even a hint of R&B (the real kind, of course).

A few years ago, I attended a concert at one of my favorite venues in Chicago, The Old Town School of Folk Music, and was completely mesmerized by the opening act, Abigail Washburn (also a member of Uncle Earl, whose Waterloo, Tennessee album is one of the best contemporary old-time country/bluegrass albums in recent years). It was through her incredible debut solo album, Song of the Traveling Daughter, that I first heard of Sollee. While his cello is heard on every song, I was too transfixed by Washburn’s voice and banjo (or maybe it was the occasional bluegrass song she sang in Mandarin…) to give any further thought to Sollee himself. He later joined Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet band, alongside Bela Fleck and Casey Driessen.

Learning to Bend was released a few months later and it immediately became one of my favorite albums of the year. The combination of unique instrumentation, earnest lyrics and soulful delivery demanded repeated listening – and I complied.

A few honest words, Ben Sollee. A plaintive, almost meditative plea for politicians (and probably Bush in particular) to be…real. The plucked cello and dirge-like fiddle set the perfect atmosphere. One of my favorite tracks from 2008.

How to see the sun rise, Ben Sollee. Jazz- and Soul-influenced, Sollee urges a former lover to give him a second chance and teach him how to…

hold a bird in my hand and watch it grow
See those feathers bloom
But don’t let it fly
Even though that’s what it’s supposed to do

It’s not impossible, Ben Sollee. While the lyrics lament societal expectations for boys to not cry, what initially grabbed my attention was the lively instrumentation straight out of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones (minus Wooten’s driving bass).

The entire album is wonderful, and it was just released on vinyl – so get it!

I also highly recommend Abigail Washburn’s beautiful Song of the Traveling Daughter album.

Sometimes, Abigail Washburn.


Find Love – Clem Snide, viagra usa viagra Soft Spot

Prismatic Room – Crystal Stilts, prostate Alight of Night

tadalafil %20104037627,%20null,%20NPR.Player.Action.PLAY_NOW,%20NPR.Player.Type.STORY,%20′0′)”>Listen I Want You to Know – Dinosaur, Jr, Farm

Head Full of Steam – Go-Betweens, Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (80s jangle, Smiths, Sundays, Australian R.E.M.)

Strange Fruit – Billie Holliday and Jeff Buckley (of course, different weight when Jeff sings it)

Palm Wine Boys, http://www.wildplum.org/CDs/WP_04126

Killer in Me, Amy Speace, YouTube – Amy Speace “The Killer In Me”


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, cialis usa unhealthy trip hop or techno, viagra buy clinic then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari (readily available on vinyl)¬†album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things (readily available on vinyl).

I’m still an electropop neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners; readily available on vinyl) released a few weeks ago. I love the opening track, “Make Light”. Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix (readily available on vinyl) has been given the repeat treatment on my turntable. Wow, infectious much?? I absolutely love the entire album. It’s a near-perfect mix of atmospheric guitar-rock, crazy-hook-filled dance beats (that occasionally remind me of Vampire Weekend), and vocals reminiscent of a softer/gentler Isaac Brock (Modest Mouse). Check out Phoenix’s earlier catalog for equally good songs.

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air (who, btw, once used Phoenix as the backing band for one of their remixes).
Lisztomania, Phoenix. It is impossible to not love this song. C’mon, I dare you.
1901, Phoenix.
Fences, Phoenix.
Make Light, Passion Pit.

Once you’ve listened to the Lisztomania track above, listen to it again by watching the video below; I have to say, it’s a perfect fit.



Posted in Current Favorite, Gateway Song, Music Mind Map.