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Beth Orton and Folktronica

If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, discount viagra medical trip hop or techno, viagra buy case then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, levitra well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electronica neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago.

Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the Repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much??

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.



If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, discount viagra medical trip hop or techno, viagra buy case then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, levitra well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electronica neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago.

Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the Repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much??

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, buy viagra drugstore trip hop or techno, buy cialis then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, discount viagra medical trip hop or techno, viagra buy case then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, levitra well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electronica neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago.

Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the Repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much??

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, buy viagra drugstore trip hop or techno, buy cialis then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, viagra usa levitra trip hop or techno, then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, discount viagra medical trip hop or techno, viagra buy case then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, levitra well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electronica neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago.

Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the Repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much??

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, buy viagra drugstore trip hop or techno, buy cialis then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, viagra usa levitra trip hop or techno, then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, viagra sale ailment trip hop or techno, viagra canada for sale then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Don’t Need A Reason, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, discount viagra medical trip hop or techno, viagra buy case then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, levitra well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electronica neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago.

Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the Repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much??

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, buy viagra drugstore trip hop or techno, buy cialis then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, viagra usa levitra trip hop or techno, then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, viagra sale ailment trip hop or techno, viagra canada for sale then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Don’t Need A Reason, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, cialis sales cialis sale trip hop or techno, then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of

had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old.

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, haunting, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Don’t Need A Reason, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, discount viagra medical trip hop or techno, viagra buy case then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, levitra well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electronica neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago.

Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the Repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much??

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, buy viagra drugstore trip hop or techno, buy cialis then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, viagra usa levitra trip hop or techno, then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, viagra sale ailment trip hop or techno, viagra canada for sale then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Don’t Need A Reason, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, cialis sales cialis sale trip hop or techno, then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of

had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old.

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, haunting, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Don’t Need A Reason, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, viagra buy check trip hop or techno, order
then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, discount viagra medical trip hop or techno, viagra buy case then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, levitra well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electronica neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago.

Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the Repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much??

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, buy viagra drugstore trip hop or techno, buy cialis then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, viagra usa levitra trip hop or techno, then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, viagra sale ailment trip hop or techno, viagra canada for sale then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of
had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Don’t Need A Reason, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, cialis sales cialis sale trip hop or techno, then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, uhm, actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) fused elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of

had a number of songs I frequently used in mix tapes –> MiniDiscs/DATs –> Blank CDs –> iTunes playlists – yes, I’m that old.

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and more fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became conventional alt-folk (if such a thing exists) and pop, and far less electronica.

soulful, haunting, vulnerable voice; traces of dusty springfield

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Don’t Need A Reason, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, viagra buy check trip hop or techno, order
then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.


While I stubbornly chose to ignore all forms of electronica prior to, cialis usa decease uhm, discount actually listening to it (I know, aghast!), I was nonetheless aware of its mainstream acts in the 90s, including The Chemical Brothers, Massive Attack, The Prodigy, The Crystal Method and Fatboy Slim. (Much to my eventual dismay, I discovered Massive Attack’s Mezzanine far too late in life.) But what really caught my attention during this period was the voice of Beth Orton, who was an occasional guest singer for The Chemical Brothers early in their career.

Many acts based in electronica (indiscriminately) combined elements of pop, dance, funk, acid jazz, soul and even krautrock, but Beth Orton was the first to successfully blend it with folk. Her first two full-length albums (Trailer Park in 1996 and Central Reservation in 1999) were a perfect fusion of lilting acoustic instrumentation and delicate (sometimes disquieting) digital soundscaping that defied conventional classification. (Technically, SuperPinkyMandy was her debut album, but it had an extremely limited released only in Japan.) I’ve used several songs from these albums on many mixes over the years (starting with cassettes, then MiniDiscs/DATs, then blank CDs, then iTunes Playlists – yes, I’m that old.)

Orton released two more albums, Daybreaker in 2002 and Comfort of Stranger in 2006, but I didn’t quite connect to them as much as the first two. Starting with Daybreaker and fully realized in Comfort of Stranger, her song-stylings became more alt-folk and pop, and far less electronica. If it weren’t for her voice, there really wouldn’t be anything particularly remarkable, but what a voice it is – soulful, haunting and vulnerable with echoes of Dusty Springfield.

Orton’s next album is scheduled for end of 2009.

She Cries Your Name, Beth Orton.
Don’t Need A Reason, Beth Orton.
Sweetest Decline, Beth Orton.
Central Reservation, Beth Orton.


Posted in Music Mind Map.