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Friday Quickie: The Silver Seas

Jamie Lidell, viagra discount primarily known for electronica/techno, surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way.

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra discount primarily known for electronica/techno, surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way.

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra sales physician primarily known for electronica/techno, generic viagra decease surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, sick a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way (is it odd that two of the three are white Brits?)

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra discount primarily known for electronica/techno, surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way.

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra sales physician primarily known for electronica/techno, generic viagra decease surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, sick a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way (is it odd that two of the three are white Brits?)

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra sale viagra primarily known for electronica/techno, viagra canada viagra surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, mind a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way.

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra discount primarily known for electronica/techno, surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way.

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra sales physician primarily known for electronica/techno, generic viagra decease surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, sick a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way (is it odd that two of the three are white Brits?)

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra sale viagra primarily known for electronica/techno, viagra canada viagra surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, mind a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way.

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, cialis sales thumb primarily known for electronica/techno, cialis usa surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way (is it odd that two of the three are white Brits?)

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra discount primarily known for electronica/techno, surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way.

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra sales physician primarily known for electronica/techno, generic viagra decease surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, sick a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way (is it odd that two of the three are white Brits?)

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra sale viagra primarily known for electronica/techno, viagra canada viagra surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, mind a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way.

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, cialis sales thumb primarily known for electronica/techno, cialis usa surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way (is it odd that two of the three are white Brits?)

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra usa treat primarily known for electronica/techno, patient surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, sovaldi sale a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way (is it odd that two of the three are white Brits?)

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra discount primarily known for electronica/techno, surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way.

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra sales physician primarily known for electronica/techno, generic viagra decease surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, sick a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way (is it odd that two of the three are white Brits?)

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra sale viagra primarily known for electronica/techno, viagra canada viagra surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, mind a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way.

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, cialis sales thumb primarily known for electronica/techno, cialis usa surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way (is it odd that two of the three are white Brits?)

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)
Jamie Lidell, viagra usa treat primarily known for electronica/techno, patient surprised everyone by releasing Multiply, sovaldi sale a R&B-inflected album in 2005.  Naturally, he was tagged with the obligatory “blue-eyed soul” label and automatically tossed in to the neo-soul pool.  Forget labels and just listen to Multiply and his 2008 follow-up album, JIM, and you’ll agree that he is one of the finest purveyors of soulful music that even Stevie, Otis and, dare I say, Sam would be proud of.  That’s right – I went there!

Now, those of you that appreciate the hint of electronica Lidell weaved into the mostly R&B album in Multiply may be asking, What about Jamiroquai?  Didn’t he combine dance/dj music with R&B long before Lidell?  Why yes, he did, but there’s one major difference – Lidell is talented.  Ouch.

I’ll admit that such high praise for Lidell is somewhat mitigated by low expectations – a result of long-held contempt and disgust for virtually all Top 40 R&B/Soul since, oh, 1982 or so.  The absurdly awful state of the genre began to suck just a little less with the Miseducation of Lauryn Hill in the late 1990s and the resulting neo-soul bandwagon.  While I’m not sure how long a typical musical bandwagon lasts, I do know that in 2008 three of my favorite albums were Lidell’s JIM, Raphael Saadiq’s The Way I See It, and James Hunter’s The Hard Way (is it odd that two of the three are white Brits?)

Here’s the title track from Multiply,

Multiply, Jamie Lidell.

(A track from Lidell’s JIM album leads off a mix I made for Amanda last year; I’ll add the mix online soon.)

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The Country Life, buy cialis no rx The Silver Seas (from their 2007 album, viagra generic High Society).

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