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Avett Brothers, Nick Hornby, Audrey Hepburn, Oh My

Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra cialis really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra cialis really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, best viagra case really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill (as opposed to the under-the-stars-with-a-beer-in-hand-while-longing-for-old-smoking-days chill of late summer nights) with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

First, I’d like to thank Alexi Murdoch’s parents for naming their son a name that starts with an “A” as “Orange Sky” is a nearly perfect song to kick off an Autumn mix.

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra cialis really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, best viagra case really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill (as opposed to the under-the-stars-with-a-beer-in-hand-while-longing-for-old-smoking-days chill of late summer nights) with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

First, I’d like to thank Alexi Murdoch’s parents for naming their son a name that starts with an “A” as “Orange Sky” is a nearly perfect song to kick off an Autumn mix.

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, discount cialis troche really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra cialis really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, best viagra case really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill (as opposed to the under-the-stars-with-a-beer-in-hand-while-longing-for-old-smoking-days chill of late summer nights) with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

First, I’d like to thank Alexi Murdoch’s parents for naming their son a name that starts with an “A” as “Orange Sky” is a nearly perfect song to kick off an Autumn mix.

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, discount cialis troche really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, cialis buy sale really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, sovaldi sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, pharmacy I’ll set the tone by posting a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album was a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra cialis really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, best viagra case really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill (as opposed to the under-the-stars-with-a-beer-in-hand-while-longing-for-old-smoking-days chill of late summer nights) with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

First, I’d like to thank Alexi Murdoch’s parents for naming their son a name that starts with an “A” as “Orange Sky” is a nearly perfect song to kick off an Autumn mix.

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, discount cialis troche really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, cialis buy sale really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, sovaldi sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, pharmacy I’ll set the tone by posting a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album was a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra canada viagra really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra cialis really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, best viagra case really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill (as opposed to the under-the-stars-with-a-beer-in-hand-while-longing-for-old-smoking-days chill of late summer nights) with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

First, I’d like to thank Alexi Murdoch’s parents for naming their son a name that starts with an “A” as “Orange Sky” is a nearly perfect song to kick off an Autumn mix.

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, discount cialis troche really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, cialis buy sale really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, sovaldi sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, pharmacy I’ll set the tone by posting a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album was a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra canada viagra really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
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I Want You To Know, viagra no rx Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, unhealthy 2009).
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra cialis really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, best viagra case really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill (as opposed to the under-the-stars-with-a-beer-in-hand-while-longing-for-old-smoking-days chill of late summer nights) with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

First, I’d like to thank Alexi Murdoch’s parents for naming their son a name that starts with an “A” as “Orange Sky” is a nearly perfect song to kick off an Autumn mix.

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, discount cialis troche really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, cialis buy sale really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, sovaldi sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, pharmacy I’ll set the tone by posting a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album was a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra canada viagra really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

I Want You To Know, viagra no rx Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, unhealthy 2009).
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

, viagra generic sovaldi sale Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, cialis pills 2009).
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra cialis really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, best viagra case really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill (as opposed to the under-the-stars-with-a-beer-in-hand-while-longing-for-old-smoking-days chill of late summer nights) with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

First, I’d like to thank Alexi Murdoch’s parents for naming their son a name that starts with an “A” as “Orange Sky” is a nearly perfect song to kick off an Autumn mix.

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, discount cialis troche really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, cialis buy sale really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, sovaldi sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, pharmacy I’ll set the tone by posting a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album was a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra canada viagra really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

I Want You To Know, viagra no rx Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, unhealthy 2009).
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

, viagra generic sovaldi sale Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, cialis pills 2009).
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

I Want You To Know, best cialis find Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, viagra canada tadalafil 2009).
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra cialis really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, best viagra case really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill (as opposed to the under-the-stars-with-a-beer-in-hand-while-longing-for-old-smoking-days chill of late summer nights) with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

First, I’d like to thank Alexi Murdoch’s parents for naming their son a name that starts with an “A” as “Orange Sky” is a nearly perfect song to kick off an Autumn mix.

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, discount cialis troche really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, cialis buy sale really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, sovaldi sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, pharmacy I’ll set the tone by posting a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album was a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra canada viagra really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
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Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra cialis really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, best viagra case really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill (as opposed to the under-the-stars-with-a-beer-in-hand-while-longing-for-old-smoking-days chill of late summer nights) with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

First, I’d like to thank Alexi Murdoch’s parents for naming their son a name that starts with an “A” as “Orange Sky” is a nearly perfect song to kick off an Autumn mix.

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, discount cialis troche really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, viagra sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, cialis buy sale really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, sovaldi sale but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, pharmacy I’ll set the tone by posting a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album was a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Autumn_Road

[Photo credit here]

It’s sad, viagra canada viagra really.  I wanted to put together a mix to fit the season, but because my digital music library is so badly categorized and tag-less I literally have to skim through my entire collection in order to make mixes (especially mood mixes).  So since I don’t have the time to put together the full mix, I’ll set the tone by posting the a few scattered songs, and hope that readers (yeah, all FOUR of you!) will fill in the blanks in the comments section.

Making a seasonal mix is all about mood.  Throw out lyrics, throw out artist intentions, throw out genre-classifications and just consider the mood it evokes. For me, the transitional period in between Autumn and Winter induces a subdued chill with a dose of wistful melancholy, or yearning (as opposed to the deep melancholy that the Winter Mix will surely highlight).

Without further ado, here’s Side A Track 1’s first installment of the Help Me Make A Mix series.  As for the art of making a mix, I have just two consistent rules: 1) On a relatively short mix, use no more than one song from any one artist, and 2) Try to match the instrumentation/vocals at the end of one track to the instrumentation/vocals at the beginning of the subsequent track (except where a hard transition is desired thematically).

Track 1: Orange Sky, Alexi Murdoch (from Time Without Consequence, 2006).  So many songs from this great album could have had the honor, but this one rises above the rest.  There’s a lingering warmth about the song that I completely love.

Track 2: ?

Track 3: Je Pense A Toi, Amadou & Mariam (from Je Pense a Toi: The Best of Amadou & Mariam, 2005).  I suppose they’re typically identified as the blind couple from Mali who make fusion-traditional music, but do yourself a favor and start your exploration with this wonderful Best Of album.  The violin and djembe (West African drum) sets a meditative tone on which the sparse electric guitar riffs evoke a palpable sense of longing.

Track 4: ?

Track 5: America, Simon & Garfunkel (from Bookends, 1968).  Doesn’t this song just make you want to go out into chill of late Autumn and explore?

Track 6: ?

Track 7: Whatevershebringswesing, Kevin Ayers (from Whatevershebringswesing, 1971).  I discovered Kevin Ayers only three years ago, and wow, this album is a complete revelation.  And the title track is richly rewarding.

Track 8: ?

Track 9: Girl From The North Country, Bob Dylan (from Nashville Skyline, 1969).  I like to imagine Bob and Johnny writing and performing this song on a misty, cloudy morning, under a mostly bare willow tree.  Yeah.

Track 10: ?

Track 11: Indian Summer, Beat Happening (from Jamboree, 1988).  How could I end an Autumn mix without adding a song called Indian Summer.  Fortunately, it also happens to be one of the greatest Indie songs of all time.
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

I Want You To Know, viagra no rx Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, unhealthy 2009).
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

, viagra generic sovaldi sale Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, cialis pills 2009).
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

I Want You To Know, best cialis find Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, viagra canada tadalafil 2009).
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
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sildenafil diagnosis Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” src=”http://www.daemonsmovies.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/aneducation_filmstill2_careymulliganandpetersarsgaard-500×332.jpg” alt=”Carey Mulligan, best cialis Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” width=”500″ height=”332″ />Yesterday, I watched a movie that I can’t quite get out of my head.  With an exquisite screenplay written by Nick Hornby, An Education unfolds the story of a smart, pretty, ambitious 16-year old girl (Jenny) in 1960s England, who is seduced by the bright lights of a glamorous adult life, a life introduced by a sophisticated, older man.  So what the heck does this have to do with Audrey Hepburn and The Avett Brothers?

Well, at the risk of playing Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon…Jenny, played by Carey Mulligan, just exudes Audrey Hepburn’s Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  And recently, The Avett Brothers released one of my favorite albums, I And Love And You, which includes a song (January Wedding) that references Audrey Hepburn:

She keeps it simple
And I am thankful for her kind of lovin’
‘Cause it’s simple

No longer do we wonder if we’re together
We’re way past that
And I’ve already asked her
So in January we’re gettin’ married

She’s talkin’ to me with her voice
Down so low I barely hear her
But I know what she’s sayin’
I understand because my heart and hers are the same
And in January we’re gettin’ married

And I was sick with heartache
And she was sick like Audrey Hepburn when I met her
But we would both surrender
True love is not the kind of thing you should turn down
Don’t ever turn it down

I hope that I don’t sound to insane when I say
There is darkness all around us
I don’t feel weak but I do need sometimes for her to protect me
And reconnect me to the beauty that I’m missin’
And in January we’re gettin’ married

No longer does it matter what circumstances we were born in
She knows which birds are singin’
And the names of the trees where they’re performin’ in the mornin
And in January we’re gettin’ married
Come January let’s get married

A simple love song with what I can only describe as a wistful triumph, a banjo that shifts from rueful to hopeful, and a semi-cryptic reference to Audrey Hepburn – see, that’s all it takes to be one of my favorite songs of the year.

January Wedding, The Avett Brothers (from I And Love And You-Buy Here, 2009).  The album will undoubtedly be included in my favorites-of-the-year list.

Also, go see An Education, one of my favorite films in quite some time.

Posted in Current Favorite.