Skip to content


Vibrato Galore: Lightning Dust

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis troche and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, try Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947-Buy Here). I don’t know why I never asked my mom about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon-Buy Here, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word-Buy Here, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album)-Buy Here, 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood-Buy Here, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart-Buy Here, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound-Buy Here, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths-Buy Here, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America-Buy Here, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids (and briefly at her wedding 10 years ago), but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda and we had a great time.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well….  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis troche and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, try Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947-Buy Here). I don’t know why I never asked my mom about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon-Buy Here, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word-Buy Here, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album)-Buy Here, 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood-Buy Here, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart-Buy Here, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound-Buy Here, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths-Buy Here, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America-Buy Here, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids (and briefly at her wedding 10 years ago), but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda and we had a great time.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well….  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, generic cialis stuff and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra usa sickness for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, sovaldi sale Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis troche and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, try Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947-Buy Here). I don’t know why I never asked my mom about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon-Buy Here, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word-Buy Here, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album)-Buy Here, 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood-Buy Here, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart-Buy Here, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound-Buy Here, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths-Buy Here, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America-Buy Here, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids (and briefly at her wedding 10 years ago), but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda and we had a great time.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well….  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, generic cialis stuff and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra usa sickness for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, sovaldi sale Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis case and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, no rx for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis troche and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, try Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947-Buy Here). I don’t know why I never asked my mom about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon-Buy Here, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word-Buy Here, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album)-Buy Here, 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood-Buy Here, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart-Buy Here, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound-Buy Here, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths-Buy Here, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America-Buy Here, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids (and briefly at her wedding 10 years ago), but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda and we had a great time.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well….  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, generic cialis stuff and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra usa sickness for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, sovaldi sale Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis case and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, no rx for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, best viagra viagra and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis troche and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, try Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947-Buy Here). I don’t know why I never asked my mom about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon-Buy Here, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word-Buy Here, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album)-Buy Here, 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood-Buy Here, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart-Buy Here, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound-Buy Here, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths-Buy Here, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America-Buy Here, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids (and briefly at her wedding 10 years ago), but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda and we had a great time.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well….  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, generic cialis stuff and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra usa sickness for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, sovaldi sale Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis case and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, no rx for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, best viagra viagra and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis healing and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra canada for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis troche and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, try Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947-Buy Here). I don’t know why I never asked my mom about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon-Buy Here, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word-Buy Here, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album)-Buy Here, 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood-Buy Here, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart-Buy Here, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound-Buy Here, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths-Buy Here, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America-Buy Here, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids (and briefly at her wedding 10 years ago), but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda and we had a great time.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well….  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, generic cialis stuff and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra usa sickness for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, sovaldi sale Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis case and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, no rx for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, best viagra viagra and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis healing and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra canada for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic tadalafil and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, site Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis troche and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, try Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947-Buy Here). I don’t know why I never asked my mom about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon-Buy Here, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word-Buy Here, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album)-Buy Here, 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood-Buy Here, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart-Buy Here, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound-Buy Here, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths-Buy Here, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America-Buy Here, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids (and briefly at her wedding 10 years ago), but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda and we had a great time.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well….  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, generic cialis stuff and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra usa sickness for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, sovaldi sale Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis case and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, no rx for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, best viagra viagra and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis healing and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra canada for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic tadalafil and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, site Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis generic recipe and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, tadalafil ambulance for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis troche and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, try Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947-Buy Here). I don’t know why I never asked my mom about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon-Buy Here, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word-Buy Here, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album)-Buy Here, 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood-Buy Here, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart-Buy Here, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound-Buy Here, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths-Buy Here, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America-Buy Here, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids (and briefly at her wedding 10 years ago), but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda and we had a great time.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well….  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, generic cialis stuff and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra usa sickness for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, sovaldi sale Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis case and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, no rx for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, best viagra viagra and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis healing and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra canada for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic tadalafil and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, site Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis generic recipe and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, tadalafil ambulance for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra hospital and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, clinic
for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, check Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis troche and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, try Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947-Buy Here). I don’t know why I never asked my mom about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon-Buy Here, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word-Buy Here, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album)-Buy Here, 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood-Buy Here, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart-Buy Here, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound-Buy Here, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths-Buy Here, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America-Buy Here, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids (and briefly at her wedding 10 years ago), but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda and we had a great time.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well….  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, generic cialis stuff and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra usa sickness for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, sovaldi sale Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis case and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, no rx for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, best viagra viagra and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis healing and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra canada for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic tadalafil and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, site Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis generic recipe and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, tadalafil ambulance for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra hospital and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, clinic
for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, check Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra sales help and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, generic cialis discount for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis troche and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, try Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947-Buy Here). I don’t know why I never asked my mom about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon-Buy Here, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word-Buy Here, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album)-Buy Here, 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood-Buy Here, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart-Buy Here, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound-Buy Here, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths-Buy Here, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America-Buy Here, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids (and briefly at her wedding 10 years ago), but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda and we had a great time.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well….  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, generic cialis stuff and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra usa sickness for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, sovaldi sale Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis case and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, no rx for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, best viagra viagra and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, buy cialis healing and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra canada for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to find that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic tadalafil and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, site Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis generic recipe and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, tadalafil ambulance for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra hospital and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, clinic
for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, check Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra sales help and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, generic cialis discount for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, best cialis patient and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra canada buy cialis for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, find Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra usa cure and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, seek for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).
My extended family had a reunion this weekend, viagra generic capsule and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, here for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, tadalafil look and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis buy malady and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy viagra ampoule for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia has changed for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids, but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we had a connection.  Well, I’m happy to report that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well.  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, cialis troche and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, buy for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, try Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947-Buy Here). I don’t know why I never asked my mom about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon-Buy Here, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bonds is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  But for one night, one by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion simply became a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski, The North Mississippi All-Stars, and Robert Randolph (from The Word-Buy Here, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album)-Buy Here, 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, going to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood-Buy Here, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with what I’m sure felt like stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  Don’t we all remember?

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart-Buy Here, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.

The Story I Heard, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds And A Sound-Buy Here, 2008).  My Uncle Joe, whose 80th birthday was the initial impetus for the reunion, announced that he was writing his memoirs.  Given some of the stories he told, I am definitely looking forward to it.  (I unfortunately have a limited choice of songs that evoke story-telling in my library, so while this song is not lyrically relevant, it’ll do for now.)

We Meet, We Part, We Remember, The Holmes Brothers (from Simple Truths-Buy Here, 2004).  As the party began to reach its conclusion, the general climate seemed to be one of satisfaction – that all the effort everyone put into it was worth it.  But it’s time to say goodbye.

Goodbye Stranger, Supertramp (from Breakfast in America-Buy Here, 1979).  Unfortunately, reunion or not, many of my distant relatives are still that – distant.  I don’t really know them and they don’t know me, but perhaps that’s how it should be.  I will, however, gladly say that that inertia could change for me and one of my cousins.

Opium Tea, Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (from B-Sides & Rarities, 2005).  I actually had no substantive reason to believe that my cousin, Estella, and I would have any bonds beyond blood ties given that we had spent time together only twice before as kids (and briefly at her wedding 10 years ago), but for some inexplicable reason I always thought we would have a connection as adults.  Well, I’m happy to discover that my intuition turned out to be true.  She and her husband, Matt, spent the night and following day with me and Amanda and we had a great time.  After we returned to our place after the party, Matt whipped out a traveling tea set and served us Chinese herbal team.  How could you not like a guy who travels with a tea set?

The Great Suburban Showdown, Billy Joel (from Streetlife Serenade, 1974).  The next morning, the four of us drove to the suburbs to see Estella’s parents, who were staying with another uncle.  We arrived only to discover that not only would we eat a pre-meal before going out for brunch, but that we would have a buffet lunch afterwards as well….  On a related note, thanks to Estella, Amanda discovered that it’s possible to say, “no”, to more food.  Right, good luck with my mom.

The Strange Museum, Paul Weller (from Paul Weller, 1992).  Upon our return to the city, we went to the new modern wing of the Art Institute.  We started with much interest and intrigue, but ended with much confusion.  I tried.

Cantelowes, Toumani Diabate´(from The Mande´ Variations, 2008).  After dinner, it was time to say goodbye at the airport.  In the soundtrack running through my mind, the closing song has to be an instrumental, and what more expressive instrument than the kora (West African harp).

[Cartoon credit here]

My extended family had a reunion this weekend, generic cialis stuff and on occasion I tried to think of songs to match a particular moment or mood.  While the beauty of a soundtrack song is that it captures or enhances a visual scene as it unfolds, viagra usa sickness for this post I’ll have to rely entirely on the song list to present a musical chronicle of this past weekend.

Family Prayer, sovaldi sale Sister Rosetta Tharpe (from Sister Rosetta Tharpe Vol. 3 1946-1947). I don’t know why I never asked my mother about the origins of Catholicism in her family, but thanks to the reunion I now know. So to kick off the soundtrack, here’s the legendary Sister Rosetta Tharpe, who merged Gospel, R&B and even Rock long before anyone else, imploring everyone to remember the Family Prayer.

Mother and Child Reunion, Paul Simon (from Paul Simon, 1972).  Extended family reunions are, by nature, awkward.  The blood line between seemingly distant members and its presumed bond is often insufficient to overcome the realities of our respective lives and personal narratives, yet still the ever diminishing degrees of blood ties still retain a pseudo-mystical power over the family tree – for better, or worse.  One by one, nuclear family by nuclear family, joyful hug after joyful hug, drink after drink, the extended family reunion was now becoming a party.

Joyful Sounds, John Medeski/The North Mississippi All-Stars/Robert Randolph (from The Word, 2001).  Lest you think the party itself was awkward, it was in fact quite enjoyable and memorable, with laughter abound.

Photograph, Weezer (from Weezer (Green Album), 2001).  By this time, a number of folks had already whipped out their iPhones and cameras to show off pictures of their babies and kids.  Combined with the babies and kids that several cousins brought to the reunion, it was by far the most kid-dominated family event since, well, we were kids.

Kids, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular, 2008).  It was 30 years ago when I was in their shoes, coming to big family events, hoping to have fun and eat lots of food, and wondering who all these grown-ups are and why are they telling me not to smoke – I’m only 8!

That Teenage Feeling, Neko Case (from Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, 2006).  I, of course, was never a pre-teen girl, but had I been one at an extended family reunion I’m sure I would have wanted to escape, much like the 13-year old daughter of one of my cousins.  I wish I could have captured her expressions on film as she suffered through awkward conversations with stupid adults making stupid comments about stupid things.  I can sympathize.

Sweet Memory, Melody Gardot (from Worrisome Heart, 2008).  As family members with kids began to leave mid-evening, the rest of us gathered around a big circle to recall memories and share stories.  In my 20s I skipped several family events and in turn missed out on much of the oral history of my extended family, so it was gratifying to be part of that again.