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Recap: Best Songs of 2008



As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the decade approaches, viagra generic try I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra usa pilule a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, advice New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the decade approaches, viagra generic try I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra usa pilule a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, advice New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis sales viagra I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra generic a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the decade approaches, viagra generic try I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra usa pilule a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, advice New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis sales viagra I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra generic a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra unhealthy I hereby proclaim this week, viagra usa look Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the decade approaches, viagra generic try I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra usa pilule a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, advice New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis sales viagra I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra generic a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra unhealthy I hereby proclaim this week, viagra usa look Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, viagra canada check I hereby proclaim this week, best cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week.  Ok, perhaps a tad overstated.  How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file.  Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed.  Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention.  I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves.  Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough.  I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow.  I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

But do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s.  His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet.

As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the decade approaches, viagra generic try I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra usa pilule a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, advice New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis sales viagra I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra generic a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra unhealthy I hereby proclaim this week, viagra usa look Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, viagra canada check I hereby proclaim this week, best cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week.  Ok, perhaps a tad overstated.  How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file.  Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed.  Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention.  I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves.  Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough.  I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow.  I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

But do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s.  His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet.

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra visit web
I hereby proclaim this week, generic cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.



As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the decade approaches, viagra generic try I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra usa pilule a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, advice New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis sales viagra I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra generic a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra unhealthy I hereby proclaim this week, viagra usa look Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, viagra canada check I hereby proclaim this week, best cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week.  Ok, perhaps a tad overstated.  How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file.  Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed.  Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention.  I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves.  Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough.  I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow.  I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

But do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s.  His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet.

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra visit web
I hereby proclaim this week, generic cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, tadalafil malady I hereby proclaim this week, best viagra physician Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the decade approaches, viagra generic try I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra usa pilule a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, advice New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis sales viagra I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra generic a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra unhealthy I hereby proclaim this week, viagra usa look Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, viagra canada check I hereby proclaim this week, best cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week.  Ok, perhaps a tad overstated.  How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file.  Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed.  Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention.  I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves.  Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough.  I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow.  I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

But do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s.  His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet.

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra visit web
I hereby proclaim this week, generic cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, tadalafil malady I hereby proclaim this week, best viagra physician Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, generic viagra pharmacy I hereby proclaim this week, Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.



As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the decade approaches, viagra generic try I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra usa pilule a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, advice New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis sales viagra I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra generic a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra unhealthy I hereby proclaim this week, viagra usa look Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, viagra canada check I hereby proclaim this week, best cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week.  Ok, perhaps a tad overstated.  How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file.  Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed.  Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention.  I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves.  Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough.  I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow.  I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

But do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s.  His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet.

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra visit web
I hereby proclaim this week, generic cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, tadalafil malady I hereby proclaim this week, best viagra physician Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, generic viagra pharmacy I hereby proclaim this week, Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra view I hereby proclaim this week, thumb Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the decade approaches, viagra generic try I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra usa pilule a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, advice New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis sales viagra I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra generic a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra unhealthy I hereby proclaim this week, viagra usa look Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, viagra canada check I hereby proclaim this week, best cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week.  Ok, perhaps a tad overstated.  How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file.  Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed.  Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention.  I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves.  Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough.  I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow.  I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

But do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s.  His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet.

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra visit web
I hereby proclaim this week, generic cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, tadalafil malady I hereby proclaim this week, best viagra physician Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, generic viagra pharmacy I hereby proclaim this week, Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra view I hereby proclaim this week, thumb Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, viagra sale viagra I hereby proclaim this week, viagra Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the decade approaches, viagra generic try I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra usa pilule a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, advice New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis sales viagra I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra generic a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra unhealthy I hereby proclaim this week, viagra usa look Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



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A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file.  Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed.  Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention.  I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves.  Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough.  I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow.  I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

But do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s.  His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet.

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra visit web
I hereby proclaim this week, generic cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, tadalafil malady I hereby proclaim this week, best viagra physician Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, generic viagra pharmacy I hereby proclaim this week, Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra view I hereby proclaim this week, thumb Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, viagra sale viagra I hereby proclaim this week, viagra Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, buy cialis sick I hereby proclaim this week, cialis buy order Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



As the end of the year approaches, viagra canada purchase I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, buy cialis a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, order New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis clinic I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, healing a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, pills New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the decade approaches, viagra generic try I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra usa pilule a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, advice New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

As the end of the year approaches, cialis sales viagra I’m mindful of 2009 albums that in some way reflect the entire decade.  Wild Light, viagra generic a band from New Hampshire – that’s right, New Hampshire – released a debut album earlier this year that manages to capture much of this decade’s indie pop scene.  They proudly wear their influences on their sleeves and don’t give a damn what you think.  New and original?  No, but they sure know how to craft nearly perfect pop songs that you just want to put on repeat.

Listen to the entire album and you’ll hear Beulah, Magnetic Fields, MGMT, Fountains of Wayne, Phantom Planet, The Shins, Weezer, and Freedy Johnston – and that’s just the 2000s (earlier influences include R.E.M., The Smiths, Brian Wilson).

California On My Mind, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).  Perhaps the best use of “f*ck” in a song in a long time.  If this doesn’t get your head bopping, then nothing will.  And it’s a nice contrast to that other song about California.

Heart Attack, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).
New Year’s Eve, Wild Light (from Adult Nights, 2009).

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra unhealthy I hereby proclaim this week, viagra usa look Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, viagra canada check I hereby proclaim this week, best cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week.  Ok, perhaps a tad overstated.  How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file.  Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed.  Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention.  I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves.  Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough.  I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow.  I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

But do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s.  His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet.

…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra visit web
I hereby proclaim this week, generic cialis Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, tadalafil malady I hereby proclaim this week, best viagra physician Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, generic viagra pharmacy I hereby proclaim this week, Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments was from the same people that sent my DMCA notice demanding the blog owner remove the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention. I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, discount viagra view I hereby proclaim this week, thumb Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the comments (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove any and all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, viagra sale viagra I hereby proclaim this week, viagra Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.


…DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice, buy cialis sick I hereby proclaim this week, cialis buy order Van Morrison Hires Goons To Abduct Your First Born Week. Ok, perhaps a tad overstated. How about, Van Morrison’s Publishing Company Really Really Dislikes Fans That Want To Promote His Music Week?

A few weeks ago, I happen to read a music blog entry that promoted a Van Morrison song, and one of the commenters (from the same people that sent my DMCA notice) demanded the removal of the MP3 file. Of course, like every other music blog owner, I clearly indicate that the music made available is for sampling purposes only and that should the copyright owner object they only need to send an email to have it immediately removed. Simple and, you know, widely accepted per convention (at least until the blog ceases to be obscure). I even make sure to link every song to Amazon so that readers can buy the album for themselves. Anyway, after reading that blog I immediately made my Van Morrison song inaccessible, which apparently wasn’t good enough. I’m not sure why they didn’t just contact me directly and instead waste their time (and that of my hosting provider) with the DMCA complaint, but I suppose they have to justify their jobs somehow. I actually worked on DMCA complaints for many years in a different capacity and know them to be mostly trivial and often toothless; so long as the music blogger removes the “offending” material upon request, it’s completely harmless.

So to all music bloggers – do yourself a favor and just remove all Van Morrison MP3s. His publishing company apparently doesn’t understand the grassroots marketing power of something called the Internet, or make any distinctions between MP3 sites that clearly exist simply to be a warehouse for people seeking to download music for free from music blogs that actually celebrate and revere music, AND encourage readers to buy records and tickets.

On an unrelated note, I’m not quite sure how my little blog got the Google juice required to attract the attention of music rent-a-cops.



I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, generic viagra view but in the meanwhile, remedy here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, prescription however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim-Buy Here).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us-Buy Here).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend-Buy Here).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy-Buy Here).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate-Buy Here).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead-Buy Here).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago-Buy Here).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound-Buy Here).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know-Buy Here).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr-Buy Here).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular-Buy Here).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park-Buy Here).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science-Buy Here).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All-Buy Here).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I-Buy Here).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive-Buy Here).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue-Buy Here).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes-Buy Here).

Posted in Mixes.