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Top 50 Songs of 2009 [#30-21]

If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).

To quickly break the recent bout of nostalgia, discount cialis viagra here’s the title track from a record I recently picked up.  While they certainly dip into the familiar sonic waters of Arcade Fire, viagra sale Modest Mouse and Vampire Weekend, the Pomegranates designed their second release to be an original concept album about a man who gets abducted by a time traveler.  The concept and its execution are a little obtuse, but the collection of shimmering (and occasionally penetrating) songs project a promising future for this young band.

Everybody, Come Outside!, Pomegranates (from Everybody, Come Outside!, 2009).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).

To quickly break the recent bout of nostalgia, discount cialis viagra here’s the title track from a record I recently picked up.  While they certainly dip into the familiar sonic waters of Arcade Fire, viagra sale Modest Mouse and Vampire Weekend, the Pomegranates designed their second release to be an original concept album about a man who gets abducted by a time traveler.  The concept and its execution are a little obtuse, but the collection of shimmering (and occasionally penetrating) songs project a promising future for this young band.

Everybody, Come Outside!, Pomegranates (from Everybody, Come Outside!, 2009).
[Hmm, viagra patient I seem to be in a nostalgic mood lately.]

I still remember the first two albums I ever bought.  It was the summer of 1984 and I was 13.  While I’m sure I had no idea at the time that I would later become obsessed with music, viagra buy sales I clearly sensed that music was more than just…music.  But it wouldn’t be for another year or so before I could really start to appreciate what music meant to me, drugstore and as much as it pains me to do it now given his taste in music a few years later (Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, etc), I have to thank my oldest brother.  If it weren’t for him, I probably would not have gained such an early love and appreciation for The Beatles, who without a doubt changed the course of my life.

I know what you’re thinking.  If The Beatles meant so much to me at the age of 14, then surely the first albums I bought the previous year were their musical antecedents – maybe Chuck Berry or Little Richard or Elvis.  Not quite.  When I walked into the Camelot music store at the local mall that shielded shoppers from the carcass-infested stench of Greeley, Colorado, I had only one intention: buy the soundtrack to, yes, that’s right, Ghostbusters.  I’ll give you a moment to laugh.

Anyway, what I did not expect was to also buy Huey Lewis & The News’ Sports album (shut up, it’s actually a decent – albeit dated – record), released in 1983.  As for Ghostbusters, well, I guessed I REALLY liked the movie…

So Huey Lewis and Ray Parker, Jr. will forever be linked in my musical world.  Of course I had no idea at the time that they were literally linked musically.

Do you remember your first?

The Heart Of Rock And Roll, Huey Lewis & The News (from Sports, 1983).
Ghostbusters, Ray Parker, Jr. (from Ghostbusters Soundtrack, 1984).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).

To quickly break the recent bout of nostalgia, discount cialis viagra here’s the title track from a record I recently picked up.  While they certainly dip into the familiar sonic waters of Arcade Fire, viagra sale Modest Mouse and Vampire Weekend, the Pomegranates designed their second release to be an original concept album about a man who gets abducted by a time traveler.  The concept and its execution are a little obtuse, but the collection of shimmering (and occasionally penetrating) songs project a promising future for this young band.

Everybody, Come Outside!, Pomegranates (from Everybody, Come Outside!, 2009).
[Hmm, viagra patient I seem to be in a nostalgic mood lately.]

I still remember the first two albums I ever bought.  It was the summer of 1984 and I was 13.  While I’m sure I had no idea at the time that I would later become obsessed with music, viagra buy sales I clearly sensed that music was more than just…music.  But it wouldn’t be for another year or so before I could really start to appreciate what music meant to me, drugstore and as much as it pains me to do it now given his taste in music a few years later (Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, etc), I have to thank my oldest brother.  If it weren’t for him, I probably would not have gained such an early love and appreciation for The Beatles, who without a doubt changed the course of my life.

I know what you’re thinking.  If The Beatles meant so much to me at the age of 14, then surely the first albums I bought the previous year were their musical antecedents – maybe Chuck Berry or Little Richard or Elvis.  Not quite.  When I walked into the Camelot music store at the local mall that shielded shoppers from the carcass-infested stench of Greeley, Colorado, I had only one intention: buy the soundtrack to, yes, that’s right, Ghostbusters.  I’ll give you a moment to laugh.

Anyway, what I did not expect was to also buy Huey Lewis & The News’ Sports album (shut up, it’s actually a decent – albeit dated – record), released in 1983.  As for Ghostbusters, well, I guessed I REALLY liked the movie…

So Huey Lewis and Ray Parker, Jr. will forever be linked in my musical world.  Of course I had no idea at the time that they were literally linked musically.

Do you remember your first?

The Heart Of Rock And Roll, Huey Lewis & The News (from Sports, 1983).
Ghostbusters, Ray Parker, Jr. (from Ghostbusters Soundtrack, 1984).
Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, discount cialis buy cialis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).

To quickly break the recent bout of nostalgia, discount cialis viagra here’s the title track from a record I recently picked up.  While they certainly dip into the familiar sonic waters of Arcade Fire, viagra sale Modest Mouse and Vampire Weekend, the Pomegranates designed their second release to be an original concept album about a man who gets abducted by a time traveler.  The concept and its execution are a little obtuse, but the collection of shimmering (and occasionally penetrating) songs project a promising future for this young band.

Everybody, Come Outside!, Pomegranates (from Everybody, Come Outside!, 2009).
[Hmm, viagra patient I seem to be in a nostalgic mood lately.]

I still remember the first two albums I ever bought.  It was the summer of 1984 and I was 13.  While I’m sure I had no idea at the time that I would later become obsessed with music, viagra buy sales I clearly sensed that music was more than just…music.  But it wouldn’t be for another year or so before I could really start to appreciate what music meant to me, drugstore and as much as it pains me to do it now given his taste in music a few years later (Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, etc), I have to thank my oldest brother.  If it weren’t for him, I probably would not have gained such an early love and appreciation for The Beatles, who without a doubt changed the course of my life.

I know what you’re thinking.  If The Beatles meant so much to me at the age of 14, then surely the first albums I bought the previous year were their musical antecedents – maybe Chuck Berry or Little Richard or Elvis.  Not quite.  When I walked into the Camelot music store at the local mall that shielded shoppers from the carcass-infested stench of Greeley, Colorado, I had only one intention: buy the soundtrack to, yes, that’s right, Ghostbusters.  I’ll give you a moment to laugh.

Anyway, what I did not expect was to also buy Huey Lewis & The News’ Sports album (shut up, it’s actually a decent – albeit dated – record), released in 1983.  As for Ghostbusters, well, I guessed I REALLY liked the movie…

So Huey Lewis and Ray Parker, Jr. will forever be linked in my musical world.  Of course I had no idea at the time that they were literally linked musically.

Do you remember your first?

The Heart Of Rock And Roll, Huey Lewis & The News (from Sports, 1983).
Ghostbusters, Ray Parker, Jr. (from Ghostbusters Soundtrack, 1984).
Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, discount cialis buy cialis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).
Hooks, cialis buy unhealthy hooks and more hooks: checkmark
Pollard’s return to form: checkmark
Makes you want to pull out the dusty electric guitar and sing loudly: checkmark

Glad Girls, Guided By Voices (from Isolation Drills, 2001).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).

To quickly break the recent bout of nostalgia, discount cialis viagra here’s the title track from a record I recently picked up.  While they certainly dip into the familiar sonic waters of Arcade Fire, viagra sale Modest Mouse and Vampire Weekend, the Pomegranates designed their second release to be an original concept album about a man who gets abducted by a time traveler.  The concept and its execution are a little obtuse, but the collection of shimmering (and occasionally penetrating) songs project a promising future for this young band.

Everybody, Come Outside!, Pomegranates (from Everybody, Come Outside!, 2009).
[Hmm, viagra patient I seem to be in a nostalgic mood lately.]

I still remember the first two albums I ever bought.  It was the summer of 1984 and I was 13.  While I’m sure I had no idea at the time that I would later become obsessed with music, viagra buy sales I clearly sensed that music was more than just…music.  But it wouldn’t be for another year or so before I could really start to appreciate what music meant to me, drugstore and as much as it pains me to do it now given his taste in music a few years later (Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, etc), I have to thank my oldest brother.  If it weren’t for him, I probably would not have gained such an early love and appreciation for The Beatles, who without a doubt changed the course of my life.

I know what you’re thinking.  If The Beatles meant so much to me at the age of 14, then surely the first albums I bought the previous year were their musical antecedents – maybe Chuck Berry or Little Richard or Elvis.  Not quite.  When I walked into the Camelot music store at the local mall that shielded shoppers from the carcass-infested stench of Greeley, Colorado, I had only one intention: buy the soundtrack to, yes, that’s right, Ghostbusters.  I’ll give you a moment to laugh.

Anyway, what I did not expect was to also buy Huey Lewis & The News’ Sports album (shut up, it’s actually a decent – albeit dated – record), released in 1983.  As for Ghostbusters, well, I guessed I REALLY liked the movie…

So Huey Lewis and Ray Parker, Jr. will forever be linked in my musical world.  Of course I had no idea at the time that they were literally linked musically.

Do you remember your first?

The Heart Of Rock And Roll, Huey Lewis & The News (from Sports, 1983).
Ghostbusters, Ray Parker, Jr. (from Ghostbusters Soundtrack, 1984).
Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, discount cialis buy cialis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).
Hooks, cialis buy unhealthy hooks and more hooks: checkmark
Pollard’s return to form: checkmark
Makes you want to pull out the dusty electric guitar and sing loudly: checkmark

Glad Girls, Guided By Voices (from Isolation Drills, 2001).

Lightning Dust hails from Vancouver, cialis sale try a lovely city with great Asian restaurants and huge pizza slices for a buck.  And yeah, buy viagra ok, ok, it also has snow-capped mountains, pristine bodies of water, misty rainforests, friendly, open-minded and diverse people. Much like the denizens of Seattle (my former hometown), Vancouverites can detect even the slightest variance in cloud cover – there’s a patch of sunlight that glistened the intersection of Burrard St and Broadway Ave for 17 minutes, you say? – so it isn’t surprising to find local bands that appreciate the shifting quality of melancholy.

Amber Webber and Joshua Wells, who are also members of Black Mountain, recently released their side project’s excellent second album, Infinite Light.  It’s difficult to classify this album given that it has elements of shoegaze dreaminess, chamber pop orchestration, electro-pop droning, and Americana folk.  Whether you love or hate this album may depend on whether you love or hate Webber’s voice and style of singing.  She has what I can only describe as a sulking twang accentuated by a vibrato that’s persistent like Elvis Costello, but nowhere as controlled.  Her voice, at times, seems to be on the verge of veering off the tracks, but never loses its grip.  I, for one, love her voice, but then again, I have a weakness for female singers with distinctive voices.

Antonia Jane, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
I Knew, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
The Times, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
Honest Man, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).

To quickly break the recent bout of nostalgia, discount cialis viagra here’s the title track from a record I recently picked up.  While they certainly dip into the familiar sonic waters of Arcade Fire, viagra sale Modest Mouse and Vampire Weekend, the Pomegranates designed their second release to be an original concept album about a man who gets abducted by a time traveler.  The concept and its execution are a little obtuse, but the collection of shimmering (and occasionally penetrating) songs project a promising future for this young band.

Everybody, Come Outside!, Pomegranates (from Everybody, Come Outside!, 2009).
[Hmm, viagra patient I seem to be in a nostalgic mood lately.]

I still remember the first two albums I ever bought.  It was the summer of 1984 and I was 13.  While I’m sure I had no idea at the time that I would later become obsessed with music, viagra buy sales I clearly sensed that music was more than just…music.  But it wouldn’t be for another year or so before I could really start to appreciate what music meant to me, drugstore and as much as it pains me to do it now given his taste in music a few years later (Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, etc), I have to thank my oldest brother.  If it weren’t for him, I probably would not have gained such an early love and appreciation for The Beatles, who without a doubt changed the course of my life.

I know what you’re thinking.  If The Beatles meant so much to me at the age of 14, then surely the first albums I bought the previous year were their musical antecedents – maybe Chuck Berry or Little Richard or Elvis.  Not quite.  When I walked into the Camelot music store at the local mall that shielded shoppers from the carcass-infested stench of Greeley, Colorado, I had only one intention: buy the soundtrack to, yes, that’s right, Ghostbusters.  I’ll give you a moment to laugh.

Anyway, what I did not expect was to also buy Huey Lewis & The News’ Sports album (shut up, it’s actually a decent – albeit dated – record), released in 1983.  As for Ghostbusters, well, I guessed I REALLY liked the movie…

So Huey Lewis and Ray Parker, Jr. will forever be linked in my musical world.  Of course I had no idea at the time that they were literally linked musically.

Do you remember your first?

The Heart Of Rock And Roll, Huey Lewis & The News (from Sports, 1983).
Ghostbusters, Ray Parker, Jr. (from Ghostbusters Soundtrack, 1984).
Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, discount cialis buy cialis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).
Hooks, cialis buy unhealthy hooks and more hooks: checkmark
Pollard’s return to form: checkmark
Makes you want to pull out the dusty electric guitar and sing loudly: checkmark

Glad Girls, Guided By Voices (from Isolation Drills, 2001).

Lightning Dust hails from Vancouver, cialis sale try a lovely city with great Asian restaurants and huge pizza slices for a buck.  And yeah, buy viagra ok, ok, it also has snow-capped mountains, pristine bodies of water, misty rainforests, friendly, open-minded and diverse people. Much like the denizens of Seattle (my former hometown), Vancouverites can detect even the slightest variance in cloud cover – there’s a patch of sunlight that glistened the intersection of Burrard St and Broadway Ave for 17 minutes, you say? – so it isn’t surprising to find local bands that appreciate the shifting quality of melancholy.

Amber Webber and Joshua Wells, who are also members of Black Mountain, recently released their side project’s excellent second album, Infinite Light.  It’s difficult to classify this album given that it has elements of shoegaze dreaminess, chamber pop orchestration, electro-pop droning, and Americana folk.  Whether you love or hate this album may depend on whether you love or hate Webber’s voice and style of singing.  She has what I can only describe as a sulking twang accentuated by a vibrato that’s persistent like Elvis Costello, but nowhere as controlled.  Her voice, at times, seems to be on the verge of veering off the tracks, but never loses its grip.  I, for one, love her voice, but then again, I have a weakness for female singers with distinctive voices.

Antonia Jane, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
I Knew, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
The Times, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
Honest Man, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
cialis canada see Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” src=”http://www.daemonsmovies.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/aneducation_filmstill2_careymulliganandpetersarsgaard-500×332.jpg” alt=”Carey Mulligan, medicine Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” width=”500″ height=”332″ />Yesterday, for sale I watched a movie that I can’t quite get out of my head.  With an exquisite screenplay written by Nick Hornby, An Education unfolds the story of a smart, pretty, ambitious 16-year old girl (Jenny) in 1960s England, who is seduced by the bright lights of a glamorous adult life, a life introduced by a sophisticated, older man.  So what the heck does this have to do with Audrey Hepburn and The Avett Brothers?

Well, at the risk of playing Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon…Jenny, played by Carey Mulligan, just exudes Audrey Hepburn’s Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  And recently, The Avett Brothers released one of my favorite albums, I And Love And You, which includes a song (January Wedding) that references Audrey Hepburn:

She keeps it simple
And I am thankful for her kind of lovin’
‘Cause it’s simple

No longer do we wonder if we’re together
We’re way past that
And I’ve already asked her
So in January we’re gettin’ married

She’s talkin’ to me with her voice
Down so low I barely hear her
But I know what she’s sayin’
I understand because my heart and hers are the same
And in January we’re gettin’ married

And I was sick with heartache
And she was sick like Audrey Hepburn when I met her
But we would both surrender
True love is not the kind of thing you should turn down
Don’t ever turn it down

I hope that I don’t sound to insane when I say
There is darkness all around us
I don’t feel weak but I do need sometimes for her to protect me
And reconnect me to the beauty that I’m missin’
And in January we’re gettin’ married

No longer does it matter what circumstances we were born in
She knows which birds are singin’
And the names of the trees where they’re performin’ in the mornin
And in January we’re gettin’ married
Come January let’s get married

A simple love song with what I can only describe as a wistful triumph, a banjo that shifts from rueful to hopeful, and a semi-cryptic reference to Audrey Hepburn – see, that’s all it takes to be one of my favorite songs of the year.

January Wedding, The Avett Brothers (from I And Love And You, 2009).  The album will undoubtedly be included in my favorites-of-the-year list.

Also, go see An Education, one of my favorite films in quite some time.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).

To quickly break the recent bout of nostalgia, discount cialis viagra here’s the title track from a record I recently picked up.  While they certainly dip into the familiar sonic waters of Arcade Fire, viagra sale Modest Mouse and Vampire Weekend, the Pomegranates designed their second release to be an original concept album about a man who gets abducted by a time traveler.  The concept and its execution are a little obtuse, but the collection of shimmering (and occasionally penetrating) songs project a promising future for this young band.

Everybody, Come Outside!, Pomegranates (from Everybody, Come Outside!, 2009).
[Hmm, viagra patient I seem to be in a nostalgic mood lately.]

I still remember the first two albums I ever bought.  It was the summer of 1984 and I was 13.  While I’m sure I had no idea at the time that I would later become obsessed with music, viagra buy sales I clearly sensed that music was more than just…music.  But it wouldn’t be for another year or so before I could really start to appreciate what music meant to me, drugstore and as much as it pains me to do it now given his taste in music a few years later (Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, etc), I have to thank my oldest brother.  If it weren’t for him, I probably would not have gained such an early love and appreciation for The Beatles, who without a doubt changed the course of my life.

I know what you’re thinking.  If The Beatles meant so much to me at the age of 14, then surely the first albums I bought the previous year were their musical antecedents – maybe Chuck Berry or Little Richard or Elvis.  Not quite.  When I walked into the Camelot music store at the local mall that shielded shoppers from the carcass-infested stench of Greeley, Colorado, I had only one intention: buy the soundtrack to, yes, that’s right, Ghostbusters.  I’ll give you a moment to laugh.

Anyway, what I did not expect was to also buy Huey Lewis & The News’ Sports album (shut up, it’s actually a decent – albeit dated – record), released in 1983.  As for Ghostbusters, well, I guessed I REALLY liked the movie…

So Huey Lewis and Ray Parker, Jr. will forever be linked in my musical world.  Of course I had no idea at the time that they were literally linked musically.

Do you remember your first?

The Heart Of Rock And Roll, Huey Lewis & The News (from Sports, 1983).
Ghostbusters, Ray Parker, Jr. (from Ghostbusters Soundtrack, 1984).
Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, discount cialis buy cialis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).
Hooks, cialis buy unhealthy hooks and more hooks: checkmark
Pollard’s return to form: checkmark
Makes you want to pull out the dusty electric guitar and sing loudly: checkmark

Glad Girls, Guided By Voices (from Isolation Drills, 2001).

Lightning Dust hails from Vancouver, cialis sale try a lovely city with great Asian restaurants and huge pizza slices for a buck.  And yeah, buy viagra ok, ok, it also has snow-capped mountains, pristine bodies of water, misty rainforests, friendly, open-minded and diverse people. Much like the denizens of Seattle (my former hometown), Vancouverites can detect even the slightest variance in cloud cover – there’s a patch of sunlight that glistened the intersection of Burrard St and Broadway Ave for 17 minutes, you say? – so it isn’t surprising to find local bands that appreciate the shifting quality of melancholy.

Amber Webber and Joshua Wells, who are also members of Black Mountain, recently released their side project’s excellent second album, Infinite Light.  It’s difficult to classify this album given that it has elements of shoegaze dreaminess, chamber pop orchestration, electro-pop droning, and Americana folk.  Whether you love or hate this album may depend on whether you love or hate Webber’s voice and style of singing.  She has what I can only describe as a sulking twang accentuated by a vibrato that’s persistent like Elvis Costello, but nowhere as controlled.  Her voice, at times, seems to be on the verge of veering off the tracks, but never loses its grip.  I, for one, love her voice, but then again, I have a weakness for female singers with distinctive voices.

Antonia Jane, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
I Knew, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
The Times, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
Honest Man, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
cialis canada see Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” src=”http://www.daemonsmovies.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/aneducation_filmstill2_careymulliganandpetersarsgaard-500×332.jpg” alt=”Carey Mulligan, medicine Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” width=”500″ height=”332″ />Yesterday, for sale I watched a movie that I can’t quite get out of my head.  With an exquisite screenplay written by Nick Hornby, An Education unfolds the story of a smart, pretty, ambitious 16-year old girl (Jenny) in 1960s England, who is seduced by the bright lights of a glamorous adult life, a life introduced by a sophisticated, older man.  So what the heck does this have to do with Audrey Hepburn and The Avett Brothers?

Well, at the risk of playing Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon…Jenny, played by Carey Mulligan, just exudes Audrey Hepburn’s Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  And recently, The Avett Brothers released one of my favorite albums, I And Love And You, which includes a song (January Wedding) that references Audrey Hepburn:

She keeps it simple
And I am thankful for her kind of lovin’
‘Cause it’s simple

No longer do we wonder if we’re together
We’re way past that
And I’ve already asked her
So in January we’re gettin’ married

She’s talkin’ to me with her voice
Down so low I barely hear her
But I know what she’s sayin’
I understand because my heart and hers are the same
And in January we’re gettin’ married

And I was sick with heartache
And she was sick like Audrey Hepburn when I met her
But we would both surrender
True love is not the kind of thing you should turn down
Don’t ever turn it down

I hope that I don’t sound to insane when I say
There is darkness all around us
I don’t feel weak but I do need sometimes for her to protect me
And reconnect me to the beauty that I’m missin’
And in January we’re gettin’ married

No longer does it matter what circumstances we were born in
She knows which birds are singin’
And the names of the trees where they’re performin’ in the mornin
And in January we’re gettin’ married
Come January let’s get married

A simple love song with what I can only describe as a wistful triumph, a banjo that shifts from rueful to hopeful, and a semi-cryptic reference to Audrey Hepburn – see, that’s all it takes to be one of my favorite songs of the year.

January Wedding, The Avett Brothers (from I And Love And You, 2009).  The album will undoubtedly be included in my favorites-of-the-year list.

Also, go see An Education, one of my favorite films in quite some time.
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

I Want You To Know, viagra sale malady Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, generic 2009).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).

To quickly break the recent bout of nostalgia, discount cialis viagra here’s the title track from a record I recently picked up.  While they certainly dip into the familiar sonic waters of Arcade Fire, viagra sale Modest Mouse and Vampire Weekend, the Pomegranates designed their second release to be an original concept album about a man who gets abducted by a time traveler.  The concept and its execution are a little obtuse, but the collection of shimmering (and occasionally penetrating) songs project a promising future for this young band.

Everybody, Come Outside!, Pomegranates (from Everybody, Come Outside!, 2009).
[Hmm, viagra patient I seem to be in a nostalgic mood lately.]

I still remember the first two albums I ever bought.  It was the summer of 1984 and I was 13.  While I’m sure I had no idea at the time that I would later become obsessed with music, viagra buy sales I clearly sensed that music was more than just…music.  But it wouldn’t be for another year or so before I could really start to appreciate what music meant to me, drugstore and as much as it pains me to do it now given his taste in music a few years later (Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, etc), I have to thank my oldest brother.  If it weren’t for him, I probably would not have gained such an early love and appreciation for The Beatles, who without a doubt changed the course of my life.

I know what you’re thinking.  If The Beatles meant so much to me at the age of 14, then surely the first albums I bought the previous year were their musical antecedents – maybe Chuck Berry or Little Richard or Elvis.  Not quite.  When I walked into the Camelot music store at the local mall that shielded shoppers from the carcass-infested stench of Greeley, Colorado, I had only one intention: buy the soundtrack to, yes, that’s right, Ghostbusters.  I’ll give you a moment to laugh.

Anyway, what I did not expect was to also buy Huey Lewis & The News’ Sports album (shut up, it’s actually a decent – albeit dated – record), released in 1983.  As for Ghostbusters, well, I guessed I REALLY liked the movie…

So Huey Lewis and Ray Parker, Jr. will forever be linked in my musical world.  Of course I had no idea at the time that they were literally linked musically.

Do you remember your first?

The Heart Of Rock And Roll, Huey Lewis & The News (from Sports, 1983).
Ghostbusters, Ray Parker, Jr. (from Ghostbusters Soundtrack, 1984).
Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, discount cialis buy cialis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).
Hooks, cialis buy unhealthy hooks and more hooks: checkmark
Pollard’s return to form: checkmark
Makes you want to pull out the dusty electric guitar and sing loudly: checkmark

Glad Girls, Guided By Voices (from Isolation Drills, 2001).

Lightning Dust hails from Vancouver, cialis sale try a lovely city with great Asian restaurants and huge pizza slices for a buck.  And yeah, buy viagra ok, ok, it also has snow-capped mountains, pristine bodies of water, misty rainforests, friendly, open-minded and diverse people. Much like the denizens of Seattle (my former hometown), Vancouverites can detect even the slightest variance in cloud cover – there’s a patch of sunlight that glistened the intersection of Burrard St and Broadway Ave for 17 minutes, you say? – so it isn’t surprising to find local bands that appreciate the shifting quality of melancholy.

Amber Webber and Joshua Wells, who are also members of Black Mountain, recently released their side project’s excellent second album, Infinite Light.  It’s difficult to classify this album given that it has elements of shoegaze dreaminess, chamber pop orchestration, electro-pop droning, and Americana folk.  Whether you love or hate this album may depend on whether you love or hate Webber’s voice and style of singing.  She has what I can only describe as a sulking twang accentuated by a vibrato that’s persistent like Elvis Costello, but nowhere as controlled.  Her voice, at times, seems to be on the verge of veering off the tracks, but never loses its grip.  I, for one, love her voice, but then again, I have a weakness for female singers with distinctive voices.

Antonia Jane, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
I Knew, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
The Times, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
Honest Man, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
cialis canada see Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” src=”http://www.daemonsmovies.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/aneducation_filmstill2_careymulliganandpetersarsgaard-500×332.jpg” alt=”Carey Mulligan, medicine Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” width=”500″ height=”332″ />Yesterday, for sale I watched a movie that I can’t quite get out of my head.  With an exquisite screenplay written by Nick Hornby, An Education unfolds the story of a smart, pretty, ambitious 16-year old girl (Jenny) in 1960s England, who is seduced by the bright lights of a glamorous adult life, a life introduced by a sophisticated, older man.  So what the heck does this have to do with Audrey Hepburn and The Avett Brothers?

Well, at the risk of playing Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon…Jenny, played by Carey Mulligan, just exudes Audrey Hepburn’s Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  And recently, The Avett Brothers released one of my favorite albums, I And Love And You, which includes a song (January Wedding) that references Audrey Hepburn:

She keeps it simple
And I am thankful for her kind of lovin’
‘Cause it’s simple

No longer do we wonder if we’re together
We’re way past that
And I’ve already asked her
So in January we’re gettin’ married

She’s talkin’ to me with her voice
Down so low I barely hear her
But I know what she’s sayin’
I understand because my heart and hers are the same
And in January we’re gettin’ married

And I was sick with heartache
And she was sick like Audrey Hepburn when I met her
But we would both surrender
True love is not the kind of thing you should turn down
Don’t ever turn it down

I hope that I don’t sound to insane when I say
There is darkness all around us
I don’t feel weak but I do need sometimes for her to protect me
And reconnect me to the beauty that I’m missin’
And in January we’re gettin’ married

No longer does it matter what circumstances we were born in
She knows which birds are singin’
And the names of the trees where they’re performin’ in the mornin
And in January we’re gettin’ married
Come January let’s get married

A simple love song with what I can only describe as a wistful triumph, a banjo that shifts from rueful to hopeful, and a semi-cryptic reference to Audrey Hepburn – see, that’s all it takes to be one of my favorite songs of the year.

January Wedding, The Avett Brothers (from I And Love And You, 2009).  The album will undoubtedly be included in my favorites-of-the-year list.

Also, go see An Education, one of my favorite films in quite some time.
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

I Want You To Know, viagra sale malady Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, generic 2009).
Leonard Cohen

Plato was a cool dude.  Sadly, viagra generic discount I don’t remember much from the half dozen Philosophy courses in college, generic viagra healing but I never forgot Plato’s Symposium on the nature of love; in particular, the semi-satirical notion that man and woman were once a single being split into two and that, as a result, the purpose of love – the purpose of life – is to become whole again.  Whether you choose to embrace the romanticism or burp-vomit from the nauseating schmaltz, you cannot deny that one of the hallmarks of artistic expression throughout human history has been the examination of the relationship between man and woman (and man and man, and woman and woman, for that matter).

Leonard Cohen wrote songs that not only recognized the complexity of love and sex, but celebrated the entire spectrum from raw and painful to painfully ambiguous to rapturously joyful.  I saw him in concert last week for the first time, and it was glorious (I love this word, but rarely find the occasion to use it – so indulge me).  Much like Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks tour last month, seeing Cohen in concert was an experience of a lifetime.  Thank goodness for his ex-manager, whose money-swindling activities forced Cohen out of seclusion from a Zen monastery to eventually hit the road (and rebuild his retirement fund.)

He thanked the audience before starting and then rather ominously said, “We may not pass this way again, so we promise to give you our all tonight.”  While the audience cheered loudly, I suspect we all knew what he meant.  For a 75 year old man, he was quite spry, gliding from one end of the stage to the other with each song.  In his dark suit and dark fedora hat, I couldn’t help but wonder if this is what a Raymond Chandler version of Singin’ in the Rain would look like.  But that voice, that unmistakable baritone voice – both jolting and comforting at the same time – singing songs of love and despair is why we listen to Leonard Cohen.

It’s hard to believe a man of his age could put on a 3-hour concert, but I had a permanent grin from the opening Dance Me To The End Of Love to the closing Whither Thou Goest.  (The performance and setlist was nearly identical to that of his Live in London recording, so the songs below are from that concert.)

Since there are far too many songs that equally deserve to be highlighted, I have to ruthlessly pick just a handful for this post.

Dance Me To The End Of Love, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  If you assume the title suggests a standard love song, then you’d be wrong.

The Future, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  I suppose it’s not surprising that Oliver Stone chose this song for the soundtrack to Natural Born Killers…

Bird On The Wire, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  Like so many other of his songs, Bird On The Wire has been covered many, many times.  Cohen’s version is still the best.

In My Secret Life, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  One of my favorite Cohen songs.

Hallelujah, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  I posted John Cale’s defining cover here.

I’m Your Man, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  The title song from one of his best albums (despite its synthpop origins).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).

To quickly break the recent bout of nostalgia, discount cialis viagra here’s the title track from a record I recently picked up.  While they certainly dip into the familiar sonic waters of Arcade Fire, viagra sale Modest Mouse and Vampire Weekend, the Pomegranates designed their second release to be an original concept album about a man who gets abducted by a time traveler.  The concept and its execution are a little obtuse, but the collection of shimmering (and occasionally penetrating) songs project a promising future for this young band.

Everybody, Come Outside!, Pomegranates (from Everybody, Come Outside!, 2009).
[Hmm, viagra patient I seem to be in a nostalgic mood lately.]

I still remember the first two albums I ever bought.  It was the summer of 1984 and I was 13.  While I’m sure I had no idea at the time that I would later become obsessed with music, viagra buy sales I clearly sensed that music was more than just…music.  But it wouldn’t be for another year or so before I could really start to appreciate what music meant to me, drugstore and as much as it pains me to do it now given his taste in music a few years later (Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, etc), I have to thank my oldest brother.  If it weren’t for him, I probably would not have gained such an early love and appreciation for The Beatles, who without a doubt changed the course of my life.

I know what you’re thinking.  If The Beatles meant so much to me at the age of 14, then surely the first albums I bought the previous year were their musical antecedents – maybe Chuck Berry or Little Richard or Elvis.  Not quite.  When I walked into the Camelot music store at the local mall that shielded shoppers from the carcass-infested stench of Greeley, Colorado, I had only one intention: buy the soundtrack to, yes, that’s right, Ghostbusters.  I’ll give you a moment to laugh.

Anyway, what I did not expect was to also buy Huey Lewis & The News’ Sports album (shut up, it’s actually a decent – albeit dated – record), released in 1983.  As for Ghostbusters, well, I guessed I REALLY liked the movie…

So Huey Lewis and Ray Parker, Jr. will forever be linked in my musical world.  Of course I had no idea at the time that they were literally linked musically.

Do you remember your first?

The Heart Of Rock And Roll, Huey Lewis & The News (from Sports, 1983).
Ghostbusters, Ray Parker, Jr. (from Ghostbusters Soundtrack, 1984).
Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, discount cialis buy cialis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).
Hooks, cialis buy unhealthy hooks and more hooks: checkmark
Pollard’s return to form: checkmark
Makes you want to pull out the dusty electric guitar and sing loudly: checkmark

Glad Girls, Guided By Voices (from Isolation Drills, 2001).

Lightning Dust hails from Vancouver, cialis sale try a lovely city with great Asian restaurants and huge pizza slices for a buck.  And yeah, buy viagra ok, ok, it also has snow-capped mountains, pristine bodies of water, misty rainforests, friendly, open-minded and diverse people. Much like the denizens of Seattle (my former hometown), Vancouverites can detect even the slightest variance in cloud cover – there’s a patch of sunlight that glistened the intersection of Burrard St and Broadway Ave for 17 minutes, you say? – so it isn’t surprising to find local bands that appreciate the shifting quality of melancholy.

Amber Webber and Joshua Wells, who are also members of Black Mountain, recently released their side project’s excellent second album, Infinite Light.  It’s difficult to classify this album given that it has elements of shoegaze dreaminess, chamber pop orchestration, electro-pop droning, and Americana folk.  Whether you love or hate this album may depend on whether you love or hate Webber’s voice and style of singing.  She has what I can only describe as a sulking twang accentuated by a vibrato that’s persistent like Elvis Costello, but nowhere as controlled.  Her voice, at times, seems to be on the verge of veering off the tracks, but never loses its grip.  I, for one, love her voice, but then again, I have a weakness for female singers with distinctive voices.

Antonia Jane, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
I Knew, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
The Times, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
Honest Man, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
cialis canada see Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” src=”http://www.daemonsmovies.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/aneducation_filmstill2_careymulliganandpetersarsgaard-500×332.jpg” alt=”Carey Mulligan, medicine Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” width=”500″ height=”332″ />Yesterday, for sale I watched a movie that I can’t quite get out of my head.  With an exquisite screenplay written by Nick Hornby, An Education unfolds the story of a smart, pretty, ambitious 16-year old girl (Jenny) in 1960s England, who is seduced by the bright lights of a glamorous adult life, a life introduced by a sophisticated, older man.  So what the heck does this have to do with Audrey Hepburn and The Avett Brothers?

Well, at the risk of playing Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon…Jenny, played by Carey Mulligan, just exudes Audrey Hepburn’s Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  And recently, The Avett Brothers released one of my favorite albums, I And Love And You, which includes a song (January Wedding) that references Audrey Hepburn:

She keeps it simple
And I am thankful for her kind of lovin’
‘Cause it’s simple

No longer do we wonder if we’re together
We’re way past that
And I’ve already asked her
So in January we’re gettin’ married

She’s talkin’ to me with her voice
Down so low I barely hear her
But I know what she’s sayin’
I understand because my heart and hers are the same
And in January we’re gettin’ married

And I was sick with heartache
And she was sick like Audrey Hepburn when I met her
But we would both surrender
True love is not the kind of thing you should turn down
Don’t ever turn it down

I hope that I don’t sound to insane when I say
There is darkness all around us
I don’t feel weak but I do need sometimes for her to protect me
And reconnect me to the beauty that I’m missin’
And in January we’re gettin’ married

No longer does it matter what circumstances we were born in
She knows which birds are singin’
And the names of the trees where they’re performin’ in the mornin
And in January we’re gettin’ married
Come January let’s get married

A simple love song with what I can only describe as a wistful triumph, a banjo that shifts from rueful to hopeful, and a semi-cryptic reference to Audrey Hepburn – see, that’s all it takes to be one of my favorite songs of the year.

January Wedding, The Avett Brothers (from I And Love And You, 2009).  The album will undoubtedly be included in my favorites-of-the-year list.

Also, go see An Education, one of my favorite films in quite some time.
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

I Want You To Know, viagra sale malady Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, generic 2009).
Leonard Cohen

Plato was a cool dude.  Sadly, viagra generic discount I don’t remember much from the half dozen Philosophy courses in college, generic viagra healing but I never forgot Plato’s Symposium on the nature of love; in particular, the semi-satirical notion that man and woman were once a single being split into two and that, as a result, the purpose of love – the purpose of life – is to become whole again.  Whether you choose to embrace the romanticism or burp-vomit from the nauseating schmaltz, you cannot deny that one of the hallmarks of artistic expression throughout human history has been the examination of the relationship between man and woman (and man and man, and woman and woman, for that matter).

Leonard Cohen wrote songs that not only recognized the complexity of love and sex, but celebrated the entire spectrum from raw and painful to painfully ambiguous to rapturously joyful.  I saw him in concert last week for the first time, and it was glorious (I love this word, but rarely find the occasion to use it – so indulge me).  Much like Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks tour last month, seeing Cohen in concert was an experience of a lifetime.  Thank goodness for his ex-manager, whose money-swindling activities forced Cohen out of seclusion from a Zen monastery to eventually hit the road (and rebuild his retirement fund.)

He thanked the audience before starting and then rather ominously said, “We may not pass this way again, so we promise to give you our all tonight.”  While the audience cheered loudly, I suspect we all knew what he meant.  For a 75 year old man, he was quite spry, gliding from one end of the stage to the other with each song.  In his dark suit and dark fedora hat, I couldn’t help but wonder if this is what a Raymond Chandler version of Singin’ in the Rain would look like.  But that voice, that unmistakable baritone voice – both jolting and comforting at the same time – singing songs of love and despair is why we listen to Leonard Cohen.

It’s hard to believe a man of his age could put on a 3-hour concert, but I had a permanent grin from the opening Dance Me To The End Of Love to the closing Whither Thou Goest.  (The performance and setlist was nearly identical to that of his Live in London recording, so the songs below are from that concert.)

Since there are far too many songs that equally deserve to be highlighted, I have to ruthlessly pick just a handful for this post.

Dance Me To The End Of Love, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  If you assume the title suggests a standard love song, then you’d be wrong.

The Future, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  I suppose it’s not surprising that Oliver Stone chose this song for the soundtrack to Natural Born Killers…

Bird On The Wire, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  Like so many other of his songs, Bird On The Wire has been covered many, many times.  Cohen’s version is still the best.

In My Secret Life, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  One of my favorite Cohen songs.

Hallelujah, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  I posted John Cale’s defining cover here.

I’m Your Man, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  The title song from one of his best albums (despite its synthpop origins).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis generic viagra then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, seek and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, prescription Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).

To quickly break the recent bout of nostalgia, discount cialis viagra here’s the title track from a record I recently picked up.  While they certainly dip into the familiar sonic waters of Arcade Fire, viagra sale Modest Mouse and Vampire Weekend, the Pomegranates designed their second release to be an original concept album about a man who gets abducted by a time traveler.  The concept and its execution are a little obtuse, but the collection of shimmering (and occasionally penetrating) songs project a promising future for this young band.

Everybody, Come Outside!, Pomegranates (from Everybody, Come Outside!, 2009).
[Hmm, viagra patient I seem to be in a nostalgic mood lately.]

I still remember the first two albums I ever bought.  It was the summer of 1984 and I was 13.  While I’m sure I had no idea at the time that I would later become obsessed with music, viagra buy sales I clearly sensed that music was more than just…music.  But it wouldn’t be for another year or so before I could really start to appreciate what music meant to me, drugstore and as much as it pains me to do it now given his taste in music a few years later (Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, etc), I have to thank my oldest brother.  If it weren’t for him, I probably would not have gained such an early love and appreciation for The Beatles, who without a doubt changed the course of my life.

I know what you’re thinking.  If The Beatles meant so much to me at the age of 14, then surely the first albums I bought the previous year were their musical antecedents – maybe Chuck Berry or Little Richard or Elvis.  Not quite.  When I walked into the Camelot music store at the local mall that shielded shoppers from the carcass-infested stench of Greeley, Colorado, I had only one intention: buy the soundtrack to, yes, that’s right, Ghostbusters.  I’ll give you a moment to laugh.

Anyway, what I did not expect was to also buy Huey Lewis & The News’ Sports album (shut up, it’s actually a decent – albeit dated – record), released in 1983.  As for Ghostbusters, well, I guessed I REALLY liked the movie…

So Huey Lewis and Ray Parker, Jr. will forever be linked in my musical world.  Of course I had no idea at the time that they were literally linked musically.

Do you remember your first?

The Heart Of Rock And Roll, Huey Lewis & The News (from Sports, 1983).
Ghostbusters, Ray Parker, Jr. (from Ghostbusters Soundtrack, 1984).
Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, discount cialis buy cialis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).
Hooks, cialis buy unhealthy hooks and more hooks: checkmark
Pollard’s return to form: checkmark
Makes you want to pull out the dusty electric guitar and sing loudly: checkmark

Glad Girls, Guided By Voices (from Isolation Drills, 2001).

Lightning Dust hails from Vancouver, cialis sale try a lovely city with great Asian restaurants and huge pizza slices for a buck.  And yeah, buy viagra ok, ok, it also has snow-capped mountains, pristine bodies of water, misty rainforests, friendly, open-minded and diverse people. Much like the denizens of Seattle (my former hometown), Vancouverites can detect even the slightest variance in cloud cover – there’s a patch of sunlight that glistened the intersection of Burrard St and Broadway Ave for 17 minutes, you say? – so it isn’t surprising to find local bands that appreciate the shifting quality of melancholy.

Amber Webber and Joshua Wells, who are also members of Black Mountain, recently released their side project’s excellent second album, Infinite Light.  It’s difficult to classify this album given that it has elements of shoegaze dreaminess, chamber pop orchestration, electro-pop droning, and Americana folk.  Whether you love or hate this album may depend on whether you love or hate Webber’s voice and style of singing.  She has what I can only describe as a sulking twang accentuated by a vibrato that’s persistent like Elvis Costello, but nowhere as controlled.  Her voice, at times, seems to be on the verge of veering off the tracks, but never loses its grip.  I, for one, love her voice, but then again, I have a weakness for female singers with distinctive voices.

Antonia Jane, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
I Knew, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
The Times, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
Honest Man, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
cialis canada see Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” src=”http://www.daemonsmovies.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/aneducation_filmstill2_careymulliganandpetersarsgaard-500×332.jpg” alt=”Carey Mulligan, medicine Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” width=”500″ height=”332″ />Yesterday, for sale I watched a movie that I can’t quite get out of my head.  With an exquisite screenplay written by Nick Hornby, An Education unfolds the story of a smart, pretty, ambitious 16-year old girl (Jenny) in 1960s England, who is seduced by the bright lights of a glamorous adult life, a life introduced by a sophisticated, older man.  So what the heck does this have to do with Audrey Hepburn and The Avett Brothers?

Well, at the risk of playing Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon…Jenny, played by Carey Mulligan, just exudes Audrey Hepburn’s Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  And recently, The Avett Brothers released one of my favorite albums, I And Love And You, which includes a song (January Wedding) that references Audrey Hepburn:

She keeps it simple
And I am thankful for her kind of lovin’
‘Cause it’s simple

No longer do we wonder if we’re together
We’re way past that
And I’ve already asked her
So in January we’re gettin’ married

She’s talkin’ to me with her voice
Down so low I barely hear her
But I know what she’s sayin’
I understand because my heart and hers are the same
And in January we’re gettin’ married

And I was sick with heartache
And she was sick like Audrey Hepburn when I met her
But we would both surrender
True love is not the kind of thing you should turn down
Don’t ever turn it down

I hope that I don’t sound to insane when I say
There is darkness all around us
I don’t feel weak but I do need sometimes for her to protect me
And reconnect me to the beauty that I’m missin’
And in January we’re gettin’ married

No longer does it matter what circumstances we were born in
She knows which birds are singin’
And the names of the trees where they’re performin’ in the mornin
And in January we’re gettin’ married
Come January let’s get married

A simple love song with what I can only describe as a wistful triumph, a banjo that shifts from rueful to hopeful, and a semi-cryptic reference to Audrey Hepburn – see, that’s all it takes to be one of my favorite songs of the year.

January Wedding, The Avett Brothers (from I And Love And You, 2009).  The album will undoubtedly be included in my favorites-of-the-year list.

Also, go see An Education, one of my favorite films in quite some time.
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

I Want You To Know, viagra sale malady Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, generic 2009).
Leonard Cohen

Plato was a cool dude.  Sadly, viagra generic discount I don’t remember much from the half dozen Philosophy courses in college, generic viagra healing but I never forgot Plato’s Symposium on the nature of love; in particular, the semi-satirical notion that man and woman were once a single being split into two and that, as a result, the purpose of love – the purpose of life – is to become whole again.  Whether you choose to embrace the romanticism or burp-vomit from the nauseating schmaltz, you cannot deny that one of the hallmarks of artistic expression throughout human history has been the examination of the relationship between man and woman (and man and man, and woman and woman, for that matter).

Leonard Cohen wrote songs that not only recognized the complexity of love and sex, but celebrated the entire spectrum from raw and painful to painfully ambiguous to rapturously joyful.  I saw him in concert last week for the first time, and it was glorious (I love this word, but rarely find the occasion to use it – so indulge me).  Much like Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks tour last month, seeing Cohen in concert was an experience of a lifetime.  Thank goodness for his ex-manager, whose money-swindling activities forced Cohen out of seclusion from a Zen monastery to eventually hit the road (and rebuild his retirement fund.)

He thanked the audience before starting and then rather ominously said, “We may not pass this way again, so we promise to give you our all tonight.”  While the audience cheered loudly, I suspect we all knew what he meant.  For a 75 year old man, he was quite spry, gliding from one end of the stage to the other with each song.  In his dark suit and dark fedora hat, I couldn’t help but wonder if this is what a Raymond Chandler version of Singin’ in the Rain would look like.  But that voice, that unmistakable baritone voice – both jolting and comforting at the same time – singing songs of love and despair is why we listen to Leonard Cohen.

It’s hard to believe a man of his age could put on a 3-hour concert, but I had a permanent grin from the opening Dance Me To The End Of Love to the closing Whither Thou Goest.  (The performance and setlist was nearly identical to that of his Live in London recording, so the songs below are from that concert.)

Since there are far too many songs that equally deserve to be highlighted, I have to ruthlessly pick just a handful for this post.

Dance Me To The End Of Love, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  If you assume the title suggests a standard love song, then you’d be wrong.

The Future, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  I suppose it’s not surprising that Oliver Stone chose this song for the soundtrack to Natural Born Killers…

Bird On The Wire, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  Like so many other of his songs, Bird On The Wire has been covered many, many times.  Cohen’s version is still the best.

In My Secret Life, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  One of my favorite Cohen songs.

Hallelujah, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  I posted John Cale’s defining cover here.

I’m Your Man, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  The title song from one of his best albums (despite its synthpop origins).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis generic viagra then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, seek and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, prescription Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with “experimental” indie music, viagra canada sovaldi then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, discount cialis viagra sale then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, illness and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra canada here then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
In 2009, cialis generic symptoms
indie heroes found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, viagra sale advice and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis tadalafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, viagra sildenafil then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, sildenafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
40. Got To Stop, viagra generic help Pants Yell! (from Received Pronunciation).

39. Saddest Summer, see The Drums (from Summertime!).

38. One Part, Two Part, Buddy & Julie Miller (from Written In Chalk).

37. That Old Sun, Foreign Born (from Person To Person).

36. Lions, The Features (from Some Kind Of Salvation).

35. Sentimental Tune, Tegan & Sara (from Sainthood).

34. Too Much Freedom, Lou Barlow (from Goodnight Unknown).

33. The Relator, Pete Yorn & Scarlett Johansson (from Break Up).

32. Fitz and Dizzyspells, Andrew Bird (from Noble Bird).

31. Harold T. Wilkins, Or How To Wait For A Very Long Time, Fanfarlo (from Reservoir).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis usa decease then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic viagra tadalafil and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
I’m still working on my 2009 and decade lists, viagra sales viagra but in the meanwhile, cialis buy medicine here’s the best of 2008 mix I made for Amanda last year.  I made it into a mix as opposed to the traditional ranking.  For this year, store however, I may force myself to make ranked lists, which, of course, are highly problematic…

If anyone wants a zip of all the songs, then let me know in the comments.

Another Day, Jamie Lidell (from Jim).

The Re-Arranger, Mates of State (from Re-arrange Us).

A-Punk, Vampire Weekend (from Vampire Weekend).

Brand New Start, Little Joy (from Little Joy).

My Friend, Dr. Dog (from Fate).

You Can Come To Me, The Helio Sequence (from Keep Your Eyes Ahead).

Skinny Love, Bon Iver (from For Emma, Forever Ago).

One Red Thread, Blind Pilot (from 3 Rounds and a Sound).

Goodbye Midnight, The Spring Standards (from No One Will Know).

Furr, Blitzen Trapper (from Furr).

Time To Pretend, MGMT (from Oracular Spectacular).

No One Does It, Department of Eagles (from In Ear Park).

Crying, TV On The Radio (from Dear Science).

Big Kid Table, Thao (from We Brave Bee Stings And All).

You Really Got A Hold On Me, She & Me (from Volume I).

Magazines, The Hold Steady (from Stay Positive).

Acid Tongue, Jenny Lewis (from Acid Tongue).

White Winter Hymnal, Fleet Foxes (from Fleet Foxes).

To quickly break the recent bout of nostalgia, discount cialis viagra here’s the title track from a record I recently picked up.  While they certainly dip into the familiar sonic waters of Arcade Fire, viagra sale Modest Mouse and Vampire Weekend, the Pomegranates designed their second release to be an original concept album about a man who gets abducted by a time traveler.  The concept and its execution are a little obtuse, but the collection of shimmering (and occasionally penetrating) songs project a promising future for this young band.

Everybody, Come Outside!, Pomegranates (from Everybody, Come Outside!, 2009).
[Hmm, viagra patient I seem to be in a nostalgic mood lately.]

I still remember the first two albums I ever bought.  It was the summer of 1984 and I was 13.  While I’m sure I had no idea at the time that I would later become obsessed with music, viagra buy sales I clearly sensed that music was more than just…music.  But it wouldn’t be for another year or so before I could really start to appreciate what music meant to me, drugstore and as much as it pains me to do it now given his taste in music a few years later (Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, etc), I have to thank my oldest brother.  If it weren’t for him, I probably would not have gained such an early love and appreciation for The Beatles, who without a doubt changed the course of my life.

I know what you’re thinking.  If The Beatles meant so much to me at the age of 14, then surely the first albums I bought the previous year were their musical antecedents – maybe Chuck Berry or Little Richard or Elvis.  Not quite.  When I walked into the Camelot music store at the local mall that shielded shoppers from the carcass-infested stench of Greeley, Colorado, I had only one intention: buy the soundtrack to, yes, that’s right, Ghostbusters.  I’ll give you a moment to laugh.

Anyway, what I did not expect was to also buy Huey Lewis & The News’ Sports album (shut up, it’s actually a decent – albeit dated – record), released in 1983.  As for Ghostbusters, well, I guessed I REALLY liked the movie…

So Huey Lewis and Ray Parker, Jr. will forever be linked in my musical world.  Of course I had no idea at the time that they were literally linked musically.

Do you remember your first?

The Heart Of Rock And Roll, Huey Lewis & The News (from Sports, 1983).
Ghostbusters, Ray Parker, Jr. (from Ghostbusters Soundtrack, 1984).
Joon Young.  Scooby Young.  Young Drew.  These are just three of the aliases I used to subscribe to Columbia House Record club in the 80s and early 90s.  Do you remember Columbia House, discount cialis buy cialis the direct-mail music subscription service that advertised 12 Cassettes/CDs For Just 1¢ in newspapers?  The ad included an envelope, a sheet of stamps in the image of album covers (mostly Top 40 and classic rock releases), and a card with 13 empty spaces on which the 12 desired album stamps are to be pasted plus a single penny taped at the top.  In return, all I had to do was buy two full-priced albums within the next year, which was the easy part.  The real challenge was having to respond – by mail, of course – to the monthly advertisement letter in time; failing to do so resulted in the automatic shipment of the Cassette/CD Of The Month.  So that’s six letters I had to mail with the Not Interested box checked on a monthly basis for about 2-3 years.  Why six?  Well, that’s because I also had three aliases for Columbia House’s competitor, BMG.  Oy.

Columbia House was purchased by BMG in the 90s, and earlier this year BMG finally sunk under the weight of its own anachronistic business model.  So to mourn/celebrate the demise of the music subscription service by mail, which, for me, had its last gasp during a drunken infomercial purchase over 10 years ago, here’s a song from the first batch of cassettes I received:

Lodi, Creedence Clearwater Revival (from Green River, 1969).
Hooks, cialis buy unhealthy hooks and more hooks: checkmark
Pollard’s return to form: checkmark
Makes you want to pull out the dusty electric guitar and sing loudly: checkmark

Glad Girls, Guided By Voices (from Isolation Drills, 2001).

Lightning Dust hails from Vancouver, cialis sale try a lovely city with great Asian restaurants and huge pizza slices for a buck.  And yeah, buy viagra ok, ok, it also has snow-capped mountains, pristine bodies of water, misty rainforests, friendly, open-minded and diverse people. Much like the denizens of Seattle (my former hometown), Vancouverites can detect even the slightest variance in cloud cover – there’s a patch of sunlight that glistened the intersection of Burrard St and Broadway Ave for 17 minutes, you say? – so it isn’t surprising to find local bands that appreciate the shifting quality of melancholy.

Amber Webber and Joshua Wells, who are also members of Black Mountain, recently released their side project’s excellent second album, Infinite Light.  It’s difficult to classify this album given that it has elements of shoegaze dreaminess, chamber pop orchestration, electro-pop droning, and Americana folk.  Whether you love or hate this album may depend on whether you love or hate Webber’s voice and style of singing.  She has what I can only describe as a sulking twang accentuated by a vibrato that’s persistent like Elvis Costello, but nowhere as controlled.  Her voice, at times, seems to be on the verge of veering off the tracks, but never loses its grip.  I, for one, love her voice, but then again, I have a weakness for female singers with distinctive voices.

Antonia Jane, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
I Knew, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
The Times, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
Honest Man, Lightning Dust (from Infinite Dust, 2009).
cialis canada see Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” src=”http://www.daemonsmovies.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/aneducation_filmstill2_careymulliganandpetersarsgaard-500×332.jpg” alt=”Carey Mulligan, medicine Peter Sarsgaard – An Education” width=”500″ height=”332″ />Yesterday, for sale I watched a movie that I can’t quite get out of my head.  With an exquisite screenplay written by Nick Hornby, An Education unfolds the story of a smart, pretty, ambitious 16-year old girl (Jenny) in 1960s England, who is seduced by the bright lights of a glamorous adult life, a life introduced by a sophisticated, older man.  So what the heck does this have to do with Audrey Hepburn and The Avett Brothers?

Well, at the risk of playing Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon…Jenny, played by Carey Mulligan, just exudes Audrey Hepburn’s Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  And recently, The Avett Brothers released one of my favorite albums, I And Love And You, which includes a song (January Wedding) that references Audrey Hepburn:

She keeps it simple
And I am thankful for her kind of lovin’
‘Cause it’s simple

No longer do we wonder if we’re together
We’re way past that
And I’ve already asked her
So in January we’re gettin’ married

She’s talkin’ to me with her voice
Down so low I barely hear her
But I know what she’s sayin’
I understand because my heart and hers are the same
And in January we’re gettin’ married

And I was sick with heartache
And she was sick like Audrey Hepburn when I met her
But we would both surrender
True love is not the kind of thing you should turn down
Don’t ever turn it down

I hope that I don’t sound to insane when I say
There is darkness all around us
I don’t feel weak but I do need sometimes for her to protect me
And reconnect me to the beauty that I’m missin’
And in January we’re gettin’ married

No longer does it matter what circumstances we were born in
She knows which birds are singin’
And the names of the trees where they’re performin’ in the mornin
And in January we’re gettin’ married
Come January let’s get married

A simple love song with what I can only describe as a wistful triumph, a banjo that shifts from rueful to hopeful, and a semi-cryptic reference to Audrey Hepburn – see, that’s all it takes to be one of my favorite songs of the year.

January Wedding, The Avett Brothers (from I And Love And You, 2009).  The album will undoubtedly be included in my favorites-of-the-year list.

Also, go see An Education, one of my favorite films in quite some time.
Crunchy Electric Guitars: checkmark
Inimitable Voice of J. Mascis: checkmark
Noise and Catchy Melody: checkmark

I Want You To Know, viagra sale malady Dinosaur Jr. (from Farm, generic 2009).
Leonard Cohen

Plato was a cool dude.  Sadly, viagra generic discount I don’t remember much from the half dozen Philosophy courses in college, generic viagra healing but I never forgot Plato’s Symposium on the nature of love; in particular, the semi-satirical notion that man and woman were once a single being split into two and that, as a result, the purpose of love – the purpose of life – is to become whole again.  Whether you choose to embrace the romanticism or burp-vomit from the nauseating schmaltz, you cannot deny that one of the hallmarks of artistic expression throughout human history has been the examination of the relationship between man and woman (and man and man, and woman and woman, for that matter).

Leonard Cohen wrote songs that not only recognized the complexity of love and sex, but celebrated the entire spectrum from raw and painful to painfully ambiguous to rapturously joyful.  I saw him in concert last week for the first time, and it was glorious (I love this word, but rarely find the occasion to use it – so indulge me).  Much like Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks tour last month, seeing Cohen in concert was an experience of a lifetime.  Thank goodness for his ex-manager, whose money-swindling activities forced Cohen out of seclusion from a Zen monastery to eventually hit the road (and rebuild his retirement fund.)

He thanked the audience before starting and then rather ominously said, “We may not pass this way again, so we promise to give you our all tonight.”  While the audience cheered loudly, I suspect we all knew what he meant.  For a 75 year old man, he was quite spry, gliding from one end of the stage to the other with each song.  In his dark suit and dark fedora hat, I couldn’t help but wonder if this is what a Raymond Chandler version of Singin’ in the Rain would look like.  But that voice, that unmistakable baritone voice – both jolting and comforting at the same time – singing songs of love and despair is why we listen to Leonard Cohen.

It’s hard to believe a man of his age could put on a 3-hour concert, but I had a permanent grin from the opening Dance Me To The End Of Love to the closing Whither Thou Goest.  (The performance and setlist was nearly identical to that of his Live in London recording, so the songs below are from that concert.)

Since there are far too many songs that equally deserve to be highlighted, I have to ruthlessly pick just a handful for this post.

Dance Me To The End Of Love, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  If you assume the title suggests a standard love song, then you’d be wrong.

The Future, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  I suppose it’s not surprising that Oliver Stone chose this song for the soundtrack to Natural Born Killers…

Bird On The Wire, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  Like so many other of his songs, Bird On The Wire has been covered many, many times.  Cohen’s version is still the best.

In My Secret Life, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  One of my favorite Cohen songs.

Hallelujah, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  I posted John Cale’s defining cover here.

I’m Your Man, Leonard Cohen (from Live in London, 2009).  The title song from one of his best albums (despite its synthpop origins).
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with indie music, cialis generic viagra then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, seek and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, prescription Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with “experimental” indie music, viagra canada sovaldi then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, generic and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style comes through in this lovely song.

45. Last Dance, The Raveonettes (from In And Out Of Control-Buy Here).  Amanda and I first heard this song during their Lollapalooza show months before the album was released.  I didn’t actually think much of it at the time, but have come to really like its swirling synths.  And as usual, the power cords and catchy chorus are still there.

44. The Ruminant Band, Fruit Bats (from The Ruminant Band-Buy Here).  Yes, I too hear Led Zeppelin during the guitar intro, but it’s decidedly a Fruit Bats song – folk-pop at its best.

43. Day Glo, Brazos (from Phosphorescent Blues-Buy Here).  There’s a cool, breezy quality to this song that transports you to a serene, isolated beach – or maybe that’s just the Chicago winter talking.  The strumming of the acoustic guitar accompanied by graceful piano lines exemplifies the effectiveness of simplicity.

42. Janglin, Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below-Buy Here).  What’s that you say?  You want to go frolic in the meadow after listening to this song?  Yes, I’ll join you there.  It shouldn’t surprise you that the band is a huge collective of a dozen post-modern retro (yes, that’s right I said it, post-modern retro – this is my blog and I can make up whatever I want) hippies.

41. Beyond Here Lies Nothin’, Bob Dylan (from Together Through Life-Buy Here).  Dylan goes Tex-Mex!  While the album didn’t equal his three previous releases, I really like the opening track.  Thanks to David Hidalgo (of Los Lobos, who I dare anyone to deny isn’t one of the greatest American bands of all time) and his accordion, Beyond Here Lies Nothin’ has a dusty, border-town mystique for which Dylan’s gravelly rasp fits perfectly.
If 2008 was the beginning of mainstream’s flirtation with “real” indie music, generic cialis see then 2009 was outright groping – we’re talking second base.  Indie heroes suddenly found their albums on the Billboard Top 10 and their songs used in commercials to hawk gas-guzzling SUVs and smartphones that aren’t so smart.  So perhaps it’s not surprising that there wasn’t anything truly new and groundbreaking in 2009 (at least on my radar).  It was a year – not unlike many years – that demonstrated that musicians unapologetically wear their influences on their strategically well-worn sleeves, best cialis and recognized that being musical is sometimes as much of a risk as experimenting.

Enough blabbering – let’s start the countdown.

50. Dinosaur, Christmas Island (from Blackout Summer-Buy Here).  Every year there’s an explosion of new hyphenated genres, and 2009 was no exception.  Lo-fi has been around the block for a couple of decades and has spawned dozens of well-intentioned but occasionally silly sub-genres (of course, lo-fi itself is a sub-genre).  The one that seems to have gained some prominence this year is garage-pop, which seeks to group bands that tightly grasp onto lo-fi’s punk and DIY aesthetics while incorporating pop sensibilities.  Ladies and gentlemen, Christmas Island.

49. Ladies, Lee Fields (from My World-Buy Here).  Last year, I easily found three wonderful R&B – and I mean real R&B – albums, so what the hell happened this year??  It was only in the last few weeks that I discovered Lee Fields’ comeback album, an album bathing in 70s Philly Soul.  Despite being in his 60s, Fields apparently still knows how to talk to the ladies…

48. Goin’ Home, Dan Auerbach (from Keep It Hid-Buy Here).  As the other half of the grunge-blues (yes, I just made that up) duo, The Black Keys, you would expect Auerbach’s first solo album to be just as heavy in the blues and you’d be mostly right.  There are, however, a few tender moments.  The delicate mandolin in Goin’ Home sets a pastoral scene that perfectly matches the wistful lyrics.

47. Shampoo, Elvis Perkins In Dearland (from Elvis Perkins in Dearland-Buy Here).

yellow is the color of my true love’s crossbow
yellow is the color of the sun
black is the color of a strangled rainbow
just the color of my lung
black is the color of my true love’s arrow
just the color of a human’s blood

“black is the color of a strangled rainbow”.  Any song with that kind of metaphorical imagery gets my vote.

46. Brand New Sun, Jason Lytle (from Yours Truly, The Commuter-Buy Here).  I really miss Jason Lytle’s former band, Grandaddy, but fortunately his first solo album rekindles some of their low-key magic.  Dating back to his days with Grandaddy, Lytle has had a talent for writing beautifully unnerving songs that deftly balance light melody with heavy lyrics.  Light or heavy, the warmth of Lytle’s style co