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Music and Dating and Matching, Part 1

[Photo can be found here]

Do I want my loved ones to listen to happy, cialis canada shop joyful songs to fight off deep sadness?? Hell, viagra sale stuff no! I want them to listen to somber, viagra soul-achingly depressing songs. But…they’re all beautifully somber, soul-achingly depressing songs. To that end, I made a mix for Amanda (and others) to be played about a month after my death, which I hope is many years in the future – of course, I probably just cursed myself to an early death. Lyrically, they’re not all about death, but each one of them evokes just that right something. They should be played late at night, lights off, sitting in front of a window with a view of the skyline or on a porch under a star-filled sky, drink in hand, contemplative mind, grateful heart.

I don’t know about you, but I find it immensely comforting to listen to melancholic songs so it’s no surprise that many of these songs have been featured on multiple mixes over the past 20 years. They’re an indelible part of me that will live on.

So in the coming months and years I’ll highlight a random selection from this ever-growing mix.

Don’t Look Back, John Lee Hooker with Van Morrison (from The Best of Friends – Buy Here). It’s John Lee Hooker and Van Morrison – what more could I possibly say? There’s something wondrous about Hooker’s world-weary baritone voice as it hovers above the melody carved out by soulful electric guitar riffs and delicate Hammond B-3 lines. And then Van Morrison drops by and kicks up the soulful factor by a few notches in a way that only Van Morrison can (one of these days, I’ll have to take on the daunting task of finally writing down what Van Morrison’s music has meant in my life.)

Seriously, listen to the song in the proper setting (as described earlier) – you’ll thank me for it.

[Photo can be found here]

Do I want my loved ones to listen to happy, cialis canada shop joyful songs to fight off deep sadness?? Hell, viagra sale stuff no! I want them to listen to somber, viagra soul-achingly depressing songs. But…they’re all beautifully somber, soul-achingly depressing songs. To that end, I made a mix for Amanda (and others) to be played about a month after my death, which I hope is many years in the future – of course, I probably just cursed myself to an early death. Lyrically, they’re not all about death, but each one of them evokes just that right something. They should be played late at night, lights off, sitting in front of a window with a view of the skyline or on a porch under a star-filled sky, drink in hand, contemplative mind, grateful heart.

I don’t know about you, but I find it immensely comforting to listen to melancholic songs so it’s no surprise that many of these songs have been featured on multiple mixes over the past 20 years. They’re an indelible part of me that will live on.

So in the coming months and years I’ll highlight a random selection from this ever-growing mix.

Don’t Look Back, John Lee Hooker with Van Morrison (from The Best of Friends – Buy Here). It’s John Lee Hooker and Van Morrison – what more could I possibly say? There’s something wondrous about Hooker’s world-weary baritone voice as it hovers above the melody carved out by soulful electric guitar riffs and delicate Hammond B-3 lines. And then Van Morrison drops by and kicks up the soulful factor by a few notches in a way that only Van Morrison can (one of these days, I’ll have to take on the daunting task of finally writing down what Van Morrison’s music has meant in my life.)

Seriously, listen to the song in the proper setting (as described earlier) – you’ll thank me for it.

I love gospel music.  I love everything about it.  If I hear a commanding voice, viagra sale sick a thunderous choir, viagra canada ampoule an elegiac organ, a tasteful electric guitar, a few hand claps, a Hallelujah or two, then there’s a 94% chance I’ll love it.

[Photo can be found here]

Do I want my loved ones to listen to happy, cialis canada shop joyful songs to fight off deep sadness?? Hell, viagra sale stuff no! I want them to listen to somber, viagra soul-achingly depressing songs. But…they’re all beautifully somber, soul-achingly depressing songs. To that end, I made a mix for Amanda (and others) to be played about a month after my death, which I hope is many years in the future – of course, I probably just cursed myself to an early death. Lyrically, they’re not all about death, but each one of them evokes just that right something. They should be played late at night, lights off, sitting in front of a window with a view of the skyline or on a porch under a star-filled sky, drink in hand, contemplative mind, grateful heart.

I don’t know about you, but I find it immensely comforting to listen to melancholic songs so it’s no surprise that many of these songs have been featured on multiple mixes over the past 20 years. They’re an indelible part of me that will live on.

So in the coming months and years I’ll highlight a random selection from this ever-growing mix.

Don’t Look Back, John Lee Hooker with Van Morrison (from The Best of Friends – Buy Here). It’s John Lee Hooker and Van Morrison – what more could I possibly say? There’s something wondrous about Hooker’s world-weary baritone voice as it hovers above the melody carved out by soulful electric guitar riffs and delicate Hammond B-3 lines. And then Van Morrison drops by and kicks up the soulful factor by a few notches in a way that only Van Morrison can (one of these days, I’ll have to take on the daunting task of finally writing down what Van Morrison’s music has meant in my life.)

Seriously, listen to the song in the proper setting (as described earlier) – you’ll thank me for it.

I love gospel music.  I love everything about it.  If I hear a commanding voice, viagra sale sick a thunderous choir, viagra canada ampoule an elegiac organ, a tasteful electric guitar, a few hand claps, a Hallelujah or two, then there’s a 94% chance I’ll love it.
I love gospel music.  I love all varieties of gospel music.  Give me a commanding voice, buy cialis pills a thunderous choir, viagra check an elegiac organ, a tasteful electric guitar, a few hand claps, throw in a Hallelujah or two and I’m sold.  Much like its musical cousin, the blues, gospel music

[Photo can be found here]

Do I want my loved ones to listen to happy, cialis canada shop joyful songs to fight off deep sadness?? Hell, viagra sale stuff no! I want them to listen to somber, viagra soul-achingly depressing songs. But…they’re all beautifully somber, soul-achingly depressing songs. To that end, I made a mix for Amanda (and others) to be played about a month after my death, which I hope is many years in the future – of course, I probably just cursed myself to an early death. Lyrically, they’re not all about death, but each one of them evokes just that right something. They should be played late at night, lights off, sitting in front of a window with a view of the skyline or on a porch under a star-filled sky, drink in hand, contemplative mind, grateful heart.

I don’t know about you, but I find it immensely comforting to listen to melancholic songs so it’s no surprise that many of these songs have been featured on multiple mixes over the past 20 years. They’re an indelible part of me that will live on.

So in the coming months and years I’ll highlight a random selection from this ever-growing mix.

Don’t Look Back, John Lee Hooker with Van Morrison (from The Best of Friends – Buy Here). It’s John Lee Hooker and Van Morrison – what more could I possibly say? There’s something wondrous about Hooker’s world-weary baritone voice as it hovers above the melody carved out by soulful electric guitar riffs and delicate Hammond B-3 lines. And then Van Morrison drops by and kicks up the soulful factor by a few notches in a way that only Van Morrison can (one of these days, I’ll have to take on the daunting task of finally writing down what Van Morrison’s music has meant in my life.)

Seriously, listen to the song in the proper setting (as described earlier) – you’ll thank me for it.

I love gospel music.  I love everything about it.  If I hear a commanding voice, viagra sale sick a thunderous choir, viagra canada ampoule an elegiac organ, a tasteful electric guitar, a few hand claps, a Hallelujah or two, then there’s a 94% chance I’ll love it.
I love gospel music.  I love all varieties of gospel music.  Give me a commanding voice, buy cialis pills a thunderous choir, viagra check an elegiac organ, a tasteful electric guitar, a few hand claps, throw in a Hallelujah or two and I’m sold.  Much like its musical cousin, the blues, gospel music

[Image can be found here]

We all have stories about the role music has played in our relationships – for better or worse.  Whether it’s something as trite as a couple’s “our song” or as creepy as groupies of reunited 80s hair-metal bands, generic viagra medicine music is inextricably linked to love, best cialis sildenafil lust, or, in the case of dating, potential.  C’mon, surely you too have been on dates or at the early stages of a relationship where you wondered about the compatibility of the other person’s taste in music.  If you’re lucky, you get to pat yourself on the back for finding someone who reinforces your taste and enhances your cultural capital; if you’re not, then you have to create the appropriate Venn diagrams to decide how much you really want to be with that person.  I don’t know if Match or eHarmony uses music taste in their matching algorithms, but I bet I would have as much success simply by knowing participant music tastes.  Admittedly, it would be a fairly extensive survey to weigh musical taste and judge musical competence, but I contend that the success rate would be quite similar to that of established dating services.  (I’ll have to work on the survey for fun.)

One of my single cousins (who doesn’t seem to read my blog) is fearful – based on exaggerations and faulty memories of others, I might add – of introducing potential boyfriends because of my unfounded reputation for being overprotective and harsh on said potential boyfriends.  Now, I admit, I do ask pointed questions that are entirely legitimate and warranted based purely on what the potential boyfriend (or girlfriend) says in the course of the initial meeting.  I mean, it’s not like I come prepared with a docket of pre-researched evidence and background checks, at least not anymore.  Anyway, if she prefers, she can simply send me his iTunes library in text form instead of a physical introduction.  Wait, what?  You did a search for “Rammstein” in his iTunes and found 31 entries?  Ah, sorry, thanks for playing, but he already lost.  (Feel free to substitute “Rammstein” with “Jimmy Buffett”, “Celine”, “Vanilla Ice”, or “Bob Marley” – but only if he bought Marley songs during a stint in a fraternity.)

So, here’s the first in a series of posts to connect music and dating/relationships.  I am, ahem, happily married, but entirely fascinated with the idea that one’s music tastes informs one’s romantic life/choices.  I’ll use a variety of sources, including actual Craigslist’s Personals ads, news items, and real dating stories and match them to appropriate songs/albums/artists.  Some will be serious, others will be in jest.

Let’s start with this Personals ad in Chicago:

I want a life to spend with my love – 22

I believe many things that most people want. Many people do not listen to there heart so they are not so aware of what they are looking for their life. I feel that communication is the most important thing in any strong relationship.

She is (probably)…

  • romantic at heart
  • more attracted to the idea of love than the trials of love
  • not particularly strong at written communication
  • a fan of Oprah and Oprah’s Book Club, but finds reading a pesky activity
  • attracted to Eastern European men given her ad picture

As her matchmaker, the song I would choose for her and any potential mate is…

Ever Fallen In Love (With Someone You Shouldn’t've), The Buzzcocks (from Love Bites, 1978 – Buy Here).

Posted in Music and Life.