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If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, discount cialis viagra trip hop or techno, then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electropop neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago. I love the opening track, “Make Light”. Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much?? I absolutely love the entire album.

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
Lisztomania, Phoenix.
1901, Phoenix.
Make Light, Passion Pit.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, discount cialis viagra trip hop or techno, then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electropop neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago. I love the opening track, “Make Light”. Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much?? I absolutely love the entire album.

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
Lisztomania, Phoenix.
1901, Phoenix.
Make Light, Passion Pit.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, best viagra cialis trip hop or techno, cialis sick then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electropop neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago. I love the opening track, “Make Light”. Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much?? I absolutely love the entire album. It’s a near-perfect mix of atmospheric guitar-rock, crazy-hook-filled dance beats (that occasionally remind me of Vampire Weekend), and vocals reminiscent of a softer/gentler Isaac Brock (Modest Mouse). Check out Phoenix’s earlier catalog for equally good songs.

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air (who, btw, once used Phoenix as the backing band for one of their remixes).
Lisztomania, Phoenix. It is impossible to not love this song. C’mon, I dare you.
1901, Phoenix.
Fences, Phoenix.
Make Light, Passion Pit.

Once you’ve listened to the Lisztomania track above, listen to it again by watching the video below; I have to say, it’s a perfect fit.



If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, discount cialis viagra trip hop or techno, then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electropop neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago. I love the opening track, “Make Light”. Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much?? I absolutely love the entire album.

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air.
Lisztomania, Phoenix.
1901, Phoenix.
Make Light, Passion Pit.


If you are anything like me prior to 2001 when I harbored absolute disdain for anything related to electronic pop, best viagra cialis trip hop or techno, cialis sick then put down your tattered copy of the final edition of No Depression and give electropop a chance. I’ll admit that I still abhor techno because, well, shitty music will always be shitty music, but there has been much to like about electropop since the late 90s.

In 2001, I was at HiFi Records, which unfortunately closed several years later, in Chicago and heard Zero 7’s “Destiny” for the first time. I was immediately struck by the warm, melodic, spacey and laid-back sound – this was not the electronica I knew (it subsequently became very clear that I actually knew very little). But surely it was atypical for electropop to use acoustic instrumentation and soulful singers, right? I soon discovered that Zero 7 distinguished itself by doing precisely that. Despite criticisms of emulating the sound of their French counterpart, Air and their much-lauded Moon Safari album, the U.K.-based Zero 7 was influenced enough by jazz and soul to carve out its own niche. And so Destiny became my gateway song to electropop. Check out their debut album, Simple Things.

I’m still an electropop neophyte and am only sporadically exposed to music tagged with the label, so were it not for the buzz it garnered, I probably wouldn’t have paid too much attention to Passion Pit’s debut album (Manners) released a few weeks ago. I love the opening track, “Make Light”. Released just a week later, Phoenix’s Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix has been given the repeat treatment on my CD player. Wow, infectious much?? I absolutely love the entire album. It’s a near-perfect mix of atmospheric guitar-rock, crazy-hook-filled dance beats (that occasionally remind me of Vampire Weekend), and vocals reminiscent of a softer/gentler Isaac Brock (Modest Mouse). Check out Phoenix’s earlier catalog for equally good songs.

Destiny, Zero 7.
La Femme D’Argent, Air (who, btw, once used Phoenix as the backing band for one of their remixes).
Lisztomania, Phoenix. It is impossible to not love this song. C’mon, I dare you.
1901, Phoenix.
Fences, Phoenix.
Make Light, Passion Pit.

Once you’ve listened to the Lisztomania track above, listen to it again by watching the video below; I have to say, it’s a perfect fit.




All music streamed from this blog is either from my own collection of purchased records and CDs (people who steal music suck) or legitimate streaming music web sites, best cialis buy viagra and are available only for a limited time strictly for sampling purposes. If you like a song, check then buy the entire album you cheapskate (or, if you must, just the track.) If you are the copyright owner of content on this blog and you no longer want free promotion of your music, then e-mail me at andrew (at) sideatrack1 (dot) com and I’ll remove it immediately.